Democratic Presidential Elector Says He Won't Vote For Hillary Clinton

Robert Satiacum says he's at odds with her views on the environment.

"She has done nothing remarkable as Secretary of State or as the senator of New York," he continued. "She's bought and paid for ... I just can't get behind her. There's no character there."

He added, "Maybe I'll vote Mickey Mouse. In all seriousness, maybe I should vote for Bozo the Clown."

How Much Could This Matter?

Satiacum's defection would matter only if Clinton landed at exactly 270 electoral votes on election night -- and Satiacum still went rogue in the face of immense pressure and weeks of unprecedented litigation.

This means Clinton would need to win 271 electoral votes -- not the usual 270-vote threshold -- on election night in order to ensure she would formally win the presidency two months later.

The news was first reported by the Associated Press.

This potential defection prompts technical questions about the obscure process of the Electoral College.

When states are projected and electoral votes from each state are assigned on Election Night, the process is not automatic. Actual people called "electors" meet nationwide on Dec. 19 to cast ballots for president. The ballots are counted in the Capitol on Jan. 6 -- thus formally and officially electing the president.

Aren't There Rules That Could Stop A Faithless Elector?

Representatives of the Washington State Democratic Party did not respond to requests for comment on Friday night. The electors were chosen at the state party's convention in June. States must settle all disputes over electors by Dec. 13.

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