DNC Rules Committee Passes 'Unity' Resolution Calling for Commission on Super Delegates and Caucuses

PHOTO: Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders stand together during a campaign rally where Sanders endorsed Clinton in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, July 12, 2016. PlayBrian Snyder/Reuters
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The Democratic National Convention's Rules Committee passed a resolution tonight establishing a "unity reform commission," a compromise from the Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton campaigns that would establish a commission next year to review the election and role of super delegates and caucuses.

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The resolution was presented to the full committee after a marathon 7-hour-plus meeting that broke twice for recesses and regrouping.

The commission will be co-chaired by Clinton and Sanders representatives, and will be comprised of nine Clinton appointees, seven Sanders appointees and three DNC appointees.

It will make recommendations to ensure caucuses are "protected," "less burdensome" and "more transparent"; make recommendations to encourage same-day registration; and make recommendations and revisions to delegate selection rules on super delegates.

The commission will have until January 1, 2018, to complete its business.

Regarding super delegates, which was the most contentious issue of the day, the commission will make specific recommendations on how to change the rules so some super delegates, such as members of Congress and governors, maintain their status, but others be required to cast their votes at the convention "in proportion to the vote received for each candidate in their state."

That is to say, all super delegates (party leaders) would still get to come to the convention and serve as delegates, but the commission would find a way to seriously reduce which ones actually remain unpledged.

The Sanders campaign is calling this commission "a victory," though some Sanders delegates were clearly disappointed.

"This is a tremendous victory for Sen. Sanders' fight to democratize the Democratic Party and reform the Democratic nominating process," said Jeff Weaver, Sanders' campaign manager. "We were pleased to work with the Clinton campaign to enact this historic commission."

The rules are expected to be formally adopted this week during the convention in Philadelphia.