Trump Campaign Stays Mum on His Specific ‘Regret,' Says 'He May' Apologize

PHOTO: Kellyanne Conway appeared on "Good Morning America" with David Muir, Aug. 19, 2016. PlayIda Mae Astute/ABC News
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Donald Trump's campaign manager Kellyanne Conway said the Republican presidential candidate's apology last night at his campaign rally in North Carolina was a decision he came to himself.

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"It was not me, that's all Donald Trump," Conway said in an interview with David Muir on "Good Morning America" Friday.

In a rare moment for the candidate, Trump admitted regret over some of the things he's said on the campaign trail.

"Sometimes, in the heat of debate, and speaking on a multitude of issues, you don’t choose the right words or you say the wrong thing. I have done that, and believe it or not I regret it," Trump said. "I do regret it, particularly where it may have caused personal pain.”

"He was talking about anyone who feels offended by anything he said," Conway elaborated today. "He took extra time yesterday going over that speech with a pen so that was a decision he made. Those are his words."

Publicly disputing with a Gold Star family of a fallen Muslim soldier, making controversial remarks about Sen. John McCain and Fox News host Megyn Kelly and mocking a reporter with a disability are just a few of the incidents where Trump has gotten himself in hot water.

Trump's public heated back-and-forth arguments with Khizr Khan, the father of fallen soldier Capt. Humayun Khan who died defending his unit from a suicide bomber in Iraq, particularly drew questions about his demeanor.

Conway did not clarify whether Trump would apologize for specific comments or whether he would personally apology to the parents of Capt. Khan.

“He may. But I certainly hope they heard him," she said. "I hope America heard him because of all the people, David, who have been saying, 'Hey, let's get Trump to pivot, let's get him to be more presidential.' That is presidential.”

She defended the timing of her boss's remarks, "Perhaps he felt it before, but he expressed it now."

"I hope that everybody who has criticized him at some point, for being insensitive or for mocking someone, at least shows some recognition and some forgiveness," Conway said.

She said that Trump and his vice presidential pick Mike Pence are also planning on visiting flood victims in Louisiana today.

"It's also presidential today to have him and Governor Pence going to Louisiana in a decidedly nonpolitical event, no press allowed, going to help people on the ground who are in need," Conway argued.

As for Trump's opponent, Hillary Clinton, Conway said she hopes the campaign "pivots to substance."

“Every time she's asked about a policy position of her own, she takes an opportunity to insult Donald Trump. She's going to insult Donald Trump and we'll talk directly to the voters," Conway said. "I hope, I absolutely hope this campaign pivots to substance because we want to challenge her on the issues."

Conway did not directly answer questions about Trump's previous attacks on Clinton's health, where he said she doesn't have the "stamina" to lead in combatting ISIS.

She responded to how Trump's assertion may be affecting women voters, among whom he has lost popularity in the polls.

"We're going to fight for everybody's vote and we recognize that all issues are women's issues," Conway said. "We’re going to earn their votes."

When asked to clarify whether Trump believes that Clinton lacks stamina, Conway responded with an assessment of Donald Trump's own energy.

“What I think is that Donald Trump is very difficult to keep up with him," she said. "It’s hard to remember he's 70 on a daily basis. He’s more energetic than most of us on the campaign trail. And on this, Hillary Clinton routinely, including just yesterday, insults Donald Trump."

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