Hillary Clinton Jokes Donald Trump's Economic Speech Was Written by '6 Guys Named Steve'

PHOTO: Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton attends a campaign rally at the Coliseum on August 8, 2016, in St. Petersburg, Florida. PlayJoe Raedle/Getty Images
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Hillary Clinton wasted little time in criticizing Donald Trump's new economic plan, which the Republican presidential nominee unveiled earlier today during a speech in a Detroit.

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During remarks at campaign rallies in St. Petersburg and Kissimmee, Florida, Clinton slammed her opponent for trying to "repackage trickle-down economics" and for creating an economic policy that she believes would only benefit the wealthy. She also took a jab at Trump's new list of economic advisers, suggesting they were probably just "six guys named Steve."

"Today in Detroit, he’s got, I don’t know, a dozen or so economic advisers he just named: hedge fund guys, billionaire guys, six guys named Steve apparently," Clinton told the crowd of roughly 2,000 people in St. Petersburg about her Republican rival, "And so, they wrote him a speech and he delivered it in Detroit. Now, they tried to make his old, tired ideas sound new. But, here’s what we all know, because we all heard it again: His tax plans will give super big tax breaks to large corporations and the really wealthy, just like him and the guys who wrote the speech, right?"

Clinton then ticked off areas where they disagree, accusing him of wanting to roll back Wall Street regulations and eliminate the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. "He wants to basically just repackage trickle-down economics," she added.

Trump, addressing the Detroit Economic Club today, called his economic plan "the biggest tax reform since [Ronald] Reagan" and called for tax-exempt child care expenses, four income tax brackets instead of his previous call for three, and abolishing the so-called death tax.

“It will present a night-and-day contrast to the job-killing, tax-raising, poverty-inducing Obama-Clinton agenda,” Trump said.

The real estate mogul also said his plan would cut taxes on the middle class, though some economists predict the opposite effect. The Tax Policy Center estimates Trump’s plan would add $9.5 trillion to the deficit over the next decade. If enacted, the plan would be the largest tax cut in modern U.S. history.

During her remarks in Kissimmee, Clinton accused Trump of only talking about the economy to "change the subject," and said she's taking a different approach.

"I intend to make the wealthy pay their fair share to build this economy," she said.

Clinton has pledged not to raise taxes on people who make $250,000 a year or less.

Meanwhile, Clinton also continued her attacks on her opponent's temperament.

"Don’t be fooled, there is no other Donald Trump, what you see is what you get," Clinton exclaimed in St. Petersburg. "He is the same person who can be provoked by a tweet. And who takes apparent pleasure in tormenting protesters at his rallies, a reporter with a tough question, even a crying baby and a Gold Star family. So just imagine Donald Trump in the Oval Office facing a real crisis. What happens when someone gets under his skin?"

She offered this advice to the crowd: "Don’t let a friend vote Trump."

ABC News' Candace Smith contributed to this report.

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