Jane Sanders Thinks Both Her Husband and Clinton Will Fall Short of Needed Delegates

PHOTO: U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders and his wife Jane Sanders wave to supporters at a campaign event, April 13, 2016, in New York City. PlayD Dipasupil/Getty Images
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Less than a week before the New York primary, Jane Sanders, wife of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, has been more vocal than ever about her spouse's campaign.

On MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” this morning, Jane Sanders predicted that neither her husband nor Hillary Clinton would reach the magic number of 2,383 delegates required to secure the Democratic nomination by the convention.

“I don't think anybody is going to get the amount of pledged delegates they need when we walk into the convention, and if that happens then I would expect that people will be looking and saying, ‘Who's the stronger candidate?’”

She added of Clinton, “Going into the convention, I’ll think she’ll be just short.”

Bernie Sanders' campaign manager Jeff Weaver argued this point on ABC News’ “Powerhouse Politics” podcast last week, saying, "The way the math is right now, it is very, very, very unlikely that either candidate will arrive at the convention with enough pledged delegates to win the nomination."

The Sanders campaign is hoping to be able to get superdelegates to back their campaign should neither campaign secure enough pledged delegates before the convention in Philadelphia in July.

Amid claims from GOP front-runner Donald Trump that the nomination process is “rigged,” Jane Sanders said today she wouldn’t necessarily call it that and noted that every state has its “own rules.”

“I think it is designed badly,” she said in an interview on CNN’s "New Day" Wednesday. “I don't think it is rigged. I don't think it is designed in anybody's favor. I just don’t think it’s very democratic.”

In an interview with The Daily Beast published Wednesday, Mrs. Sanders admitted that she and Bernie would support Democratic front-runner Clinton in the general election and encouraged Sanders voters to follow their lead.

Mrs. Sanders also said that if the Vermont senator nabbed the nomination, she would hope Clinton’s supporters would do the same for Bernie.