McConnell calls for the government to remain open, will introduce Green New Deal

PHOTO: President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with the President of Colombia Ivan Duque, Feb.13, 2019 in the Oval Office. PlayMichael Reynolds/Getty Images
WATCH What is the Green New Deal?

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., publicly pushed for President Donald Trump to approve a bill that would keep the government open past Feb. 15 at a press conference on Tuesday.

“It’s not everything the president hoped to get,” said McConnell. “But I think it's a good step in the right direction. I hope he'll decide to sign it.”

ABC News' Senior Congressional Correspondent Mary Bruce said McConnell wants to avoid another shutdown at almost any cost.

"That is as clear as you are going to get from the man, saying ‘White House, listen up and get onboard,’" Bruce told ABC News’ Chief White House Correspondent Jonathan Karl and ABC News’ Political Director Rick Klein on the Powerhouse Politics Podcast on Wednesday.

"You are not hearing Republican leadership and fiscally conservative Republicans saying that billions and billions for the president's wall right now is a good use of taxpayer money,” she said. “They just want to move on."

The proposed bill has politicians on Capitol Hill feeling deja vu. Prior to the shutdown, the Senate approved a bill to keep the government running through Feb. 8, and it appeared that it would pass. Then Trump announced he would not support it.

“No one wants to go through that again,” said Bruce.

PHOTO: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, speaks during a news conference following a weekly policy luncheon on Capitol Hill, Feb. 12, 2019. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, speaks during a news conference following a weekly policy luncheon on Capitol Hill, Feb. 12, 2019.

McConnell also announced his intention to bring the Green New Deal, proposed by Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y. to the Senate floor. The legislation would serve as a nonbinding plan to significantly cut U.S. carbon emissions and create environmentally-friendly jobs. But critics say the goal of net-zero emissions by 2050 would come with a high price tag, as buildings would require upgrades and most vehicles on the road would have to be overhauled.

(MORE: Ocasio-Cortez, Democrats propose 'Green New Deal' to counter climate change)

McConnell described the vote as a chance to "give everybody an opportunity to go on record.”

“I believe there was a certain smirk across Mitch McConnell's face that I detected yesterday,” said Bruce.

The Green New Deal is seen by many as a sign of a Democratic Party moving further left, and a vote could put Senate Democrats and well as presidential candidate hopefuls in a tight spot.

(MORE: McConnell wields Green New Deal as bludgeon against Dems)

Bruce add that McConnell knows that this could “fracture and splinter some of the Democrats and this is him saying ‘Oh this is what you want? Go for it. I'll give you the opportunity.’“

No date for the vote has been set.

Every Wednesday, ABC Radio and iTunes bring you the "Powerhouse Politics" podcast, which includes interviews and in-depth looks at the people and events shaping U.S. politics. Hosted by ABC News Chief White House Correspondent Jonathan Karl and ABC News Political Director Rick Klein.