How Undecided Voters Felt About the Vice Presidential Debate

PHOTO: Republican vice-presidential nominee Gov. Mike Pence and Democratic vice-presidential nominee Sen. Tim Kaine during the vice-presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Va., Oct. 4, 2016.PlayJulio Cortez/AP Photo | Patrick Semansky/AP Photo
WATCH How Undecided Voters Felt About VP Debate

Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., and Gov. Mike Pence, R-Ind., squared off last night in the first and only vice presidential debate of the 2016 race. For undecided voters across the country, the debate offered a chance to learn more about the policies and plans of the candidates at the top of each ticket through their lesser-known running mates.

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A majority of Americans, 64 percent, said they were likely to tune in, with 10 percent saying the debate could have a major impact on their vote in November, according to ABC News polling.

As Election Day nears, ABC News has been tracking the decision-making process of three undecided voters in key, battleground states. Lacey Dickinson, a 28-year-old nonprofit staffer in Philadelphia is closely watching the race, with an eye toward casting her ballot for Hillary Clinton or Green Party candidate Jill Stein.

Carolyn Garavente, 24, a project manager in Greensboro, North Carolina, is struggling to fully support her party's candidate, Donald Trump.

And Peter Macone, a 32-year-old restaurant manager in Manchester, New Hampsire, is torn between voting for Clinton and writing in the former candidate with whom his views most closely align, Bernie Sanders.

All three watched and heard what Kaine and Pence had to say last night. Did it help them reach a decision?

WATCH: Where Undecided Voters Stand After First Presidential Debate

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