Sarah Baker, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
  • Cleveland kidnapping survivors Amanda Berry and Gina DeJesus talk for the first time in an exclusive interview with ABC's Robin Roberts about what happened inside the house where Ariel Castro held them captive for more than 10 years. Watch "Captive: A Journey of Hope and Survival" on April 28 at 10 p.m. ET on ABC. The two women also talked to Roberts about their upcoming book, "Hope: A Memoir of Survival in Cleveland," which was released on April 27.
    Sarah Baker, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
  • These police evidence photos show a glimpse inside Ariel Castro's home where Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and fellow survivor Michelle Knight were kept. Castro abducted the three women in 2002 and 2004, respectively, when they were in their teens and early 20s. They escaped from Castro’s home in May 2013.
    FBI
  • Berry was abducted on April 21, 2003, the day before her 17th birthday. Castro offered to give her a ride home, which she accepted, but he took her to his house on Seymour Avenue. Berry said when she went inside, he showed her a mystery woman sleeping in a bedroom in front of a TV set. “When I seen her … it was like a little peephole that, like, the doorknob was supposed to go in,” she told Roberts. Here, a similar one is shown in this evidence photo. What Berry didn’t know at the time was that the woman was 22-year-old Michelle Knight, who had been Castro’s prisoner for almost a year.
    FBI
  • Berry said Castro had told her the mystery woman was his roommate. In the next bedroom, Berry said Castro told her to pull down her pants. “And from there, I knew, like, this was not going to be good,” she said. Castro then took her down to the basement, pictured here, and made her his second prisoner. “He chained [me] up to this pole and it was, like, a really thick chain, like a motor chain or something, and he just left me there,” Berry said. “He shut the lights off and put a little TV there and I was just left in the dark.”
    FBI
  • “When he took me to the basement,” Berry said. “He taped my wrist and … he taped my ankles and he put on a belt around my ankles over the tape. … And he put a helmet over my head … and he said, ‘Just be quiet and don’t make any noise. And I’ll take you home.’” Berry said Castro then left her in the dark with just a TV. “I just started screaming and crying and, ‘Somebody please help me,’ you know. And nobody, nobody came,” Berry said.
    FBI
  • Almost a year after kidnapping Berry, Castro searched for another girl just five blocks from where he took Berry. Gina DeJesus, who was a friend of Castro’s daughter, Arlene Castro, was 14 years old when she became his third prisoner. He took her to his house after asking her to help find his daughter. “He’s like, starts like, to like touch me and stuff, and then, I’m like, ‘What are you doing? You could go to jail?’” DeJesus told Roberts. He then led her to the basement, seen here, and though DeJesus said she fought him, he overpowered her and left her chained down there.
    FBI
  • At first, all three women were isolated in separate bedrooms on the second floor. Later, DeJesus and Knight were chained together in one room, pictured here. "He had a hole in the wall from [Amanda's] room to my room. He had ... the chain, and he had it on my ankle," DeJesus said. Berry and DeJesus said Castro enforced rigid house rules.
    FBI
  • Castro's house was 1,400 square feet with four bedrooms and one bathroom. "There were doors that were put on the windows completely covering the windows so no light could come in," FBI agent Tim Kolonik told Roberts. "There were the bolts that held those doors on the wall, were sheared off. There was no way they could get at them, and those were even behind Plexiglas." A door covering a window in DeJesus and Knight's room is pictured here.
    FBI
  • On Christmas in 2006, Berry's daughter Jocelyn was born. "You know, at first, that's what I was worried about. This is his kid, you know. How do I feel about that? And she resembled him a lot, and I would look at her, and I just felt like, she's mine. She's mine," Berry said. Together, Berry and her daughter shared the room pictured here. Castro locked Jocelyn up with the others until she was almost 3 years old.
    FBI
  • Castro kept all three of the women chained at times during their captivity. DeJesus and Knight were chained together in their room. Berry was chained in her room with Jocelyn. "[Jocelyn] was about 2, almost 3 years old, and he finally took the chains off of me," Berry said.
    FBI
  • Berry tried to make Jocelyn’s life normal in their room, seen here. She covered the doors over her windows with a shower curtain with green frogs and pasted the alphabet up on a wall. In summer 2011, when Jocelyn was almost 5 years old, Berry transformed the room into a school for her daughter to attend kindergarten. Castro allowed Jocelyn freedoms the three women were not. She could go outside and attended Sunday church services down the street.
    FBI
  • On May 6, 2013, Jocelyn told the women that Castro wasn’t home and that his car was gone. Berry, finding her bedroom door unlocked for the first time in 10 years, she said, went downstairs. The front door was wired with an alarm, seen here, and beyond it the storm door was padlocked shut. But Berry worked her arm out the door and yelled for help. While one neighbor was afraid to intervene, another, Charles Ramsey, came to help open the door. Berry kicked out the rest of the way, escaped and called 911. “I still don’t know why he left that day with the door unlocked. I will never know,” Berry said.
    FBI
  • On Aug. 1, 2013, Castro was sentenced to life plus 1,000 years in prison after he pled guilty to 937 counts of kidnapping and rape. On Sept. 3, 2013, he was found dead in his prison cell after committing suicide by hanging. Days after the sentencing, the house on Seymour Avenue, pictured here, was demolished in less than one hour. Berry said she cried. “I think it was, like, tears of happiness. Like, everything bad that happened in that house, and now it’s gone. Like, maybe it kind of took something away, you know, like, some of the pain. Like, we would never go there again,” Berry said.
    Getty Images
  • During their time in captivity, the young women wrote down thoughts and colored drawings to fill the time on whatever scraps of paper Castro would leave them. Shown here, DeJesus and Berry look over some of their old writings.
    Heidi Gutman/ABC
  • Berry said Castro would bring them fast food sometimes, and they would save the bags. One fast food bag, she said, "could last a good week if you needed it to" as writing paper.
    Heidi Gutman/ABC
  • When asked what was the biggest part of herself that Castro stole, Berry said, "a normal life" as a teenage girl. "Having birthdays â?¦ going to a prom, having those fun, fun times as just a regular teenager," she added.
    Heidi Gutman/ABC
  • Berry kept a diary in a composition book that Castro gave her. In one of her entries, seen here, she wrote about how she could "never imagine" having a child go missing. Berry's mother died of a massive heart attack while Berry was held captive in Castro's home, never knowing where her daughter was.
    Heidi Gutman/ABC
  • Berry and DeJesus have remained friends, and though they don't keep in touch with Knight, they wish her the best. Berry and DeJesus' memoir together, "Hope: A Memoir of Survival in Cleveland," was released on April 27. DeJesus is now in school and got her driver's license. Berry has been caring for Jocelyn and also hopes to finish school. "We just have a bright future," Berry said. Watch "Captive: A Journey of Hope and Survival" on April 28 at 10 p.m. ET on ABC.
    Heidi Gutman/ABC