© Andrew Moore
  • Homesteaders' Tree, Cherry County, Nebraska, 2011

    Homesteaders' Tree, Cherry County, Nebraska, 2011
    Photographer, Andrew Moore's book, "Dirt Meridian," refers to the 100th Meridian, the longitude that bisects the U.S. and has long been considered the dividing line between the East and West. "Dirt Meridian" interweaves two stories: the myths and history of the vast, severe American High Plains alongside portraits of the people who live there today. "Dirt Meridian" can be purchased from <a href="http://www.artbook.com/9788862084123.html" target="external">Artbook.</a>
    © Andrew Moore
  • Uncle Teed, Sioux County, Nebraska, 2013

    Uncle Teed, Sioux County, Nebraska, 2013
    In an old farmhouse accessible only by dirt cattle tracks, a 92-year-old bachelor, Lynn Lincoln Bauer, who'd spent all but two of those years within the borders of his family's property was enjoying the first hot water he felt from his taps in 25 years. Bauer goes by Teed, short for Teddie, a nickname drawn form his older brother's childhood attempts to call him Sweetie as their mother did.
    © Andrew Moore
  • Henry Road, Niobrara County, Wyoming, 2013

    Henry Road, Niobrara County, Wyoming, 2013
    Henry Road, which cleaves to the border of Nebraska and Wyoming, also cuts through land homesteaded by Donald and Lorena Ellicott in 1908. Their descendants continue to ranch and call this land home. The small house in the picture belonged to some homesteaders who didn't quite make it, but none of the Ellicotts remember who they were or quite when they left, except that they had departed by the early years of the Dust Bowl.
    © Andrew Moore
  • Abbott Family at the Big House, Cherry County, Nebraska, 2012

    Abbott Family at the Big House, Cherry County, Nebraska, 2012
    This concrete block house was originally built for the Metzger family in 1911. A year before the home was erected, a mixture of cement and sand from a nearby meadow was pressed into blocks using a Sears Roebuck "Wizard" machine. The exterior walls have an airspace between the double blocks to provide insulation, and it is said that not one block has ever cracked or been replaced. All this work was done by a German immigrant named Karl Tuchenhagen. The Abbott family purchased it in the 1960s. On the porch are Diane Shadbolt, Chris Abbott, Mike Abbott, and Harrison, Mike's son.
    © Andrew Moore
  • Along the Bad River, Haakon County, South Dakota, 2014

    Along the Bad River, Haakon County, South Dakota, 2014
    The Bad River - or Wakpa Sica, in the Sioux language - is a tributary of Missouri. Most likely it is known as bad because of the river's tendency to turn dangerously turbulent and swift, particularly after a rain. It is also considered bad because of its high amounts of magnesia.
    © Andrew Moore
  • J.D. Jerde and the Old Post Office, Harding County, South Dakota, 2014

    J.D. Jerde and the Old Post Office, Harding County, South Dakota, 2014
    Before it was the chicken coop for the Great Plains Buffalo Ranch, this old house served as a post office in a town to the west. In previous times, it was common for these to be located in someone's home. Often it was just a box or a crate in the corner of a small room, but nonetheless, for the homesteaders it was a prominent status symbol to be designated as such.
    © Andrew Moore
  • Flying H Buffalo Ranch, Walworth County, South Dakota, 2006

    Flying H Buffalo Ranch, Walworth County, South Dakota, 2006
    A buffalo can jump a six-foot gate, so for years buffalo ranchers built very substantial fences: six wires with taller posts. Now they build a three- or four-wire fence and electrify one of the wires from time to time. As buffalo are very quick studies, the fence doesn't even have to be energized to be effective, once the animal learns of electricity's potential wallop.
    © Andrew Moore
  • Dixie's Café, McKenzie County, North Dakota, 2014

    Dixie's Café, McKenzie County, North Dakota, 2014
    Near the front door at this small restaurant in Keene is a sign that says "Almost World Famous Dixie's Cafe." This cafe is operated by Dixie Brown, who is helped out by both her daughter and mother, who are seen in the picture. This is where all the neighbors get together for breakfast or lunch or just to visit and play cards.
    © Andrew Moore
  • Stone House on the Cheyenne River, Fall River County, South Dakota, 2013

    Stone House on the Cheyenne River, Fall River County, South Dakota, 2013
    Built in 1893 from local Fall River red sandstone, this two-story house was originally much closer to the channel of the Cheyenne River than it is now. This can be seen by the arcing rings of Cottonwood trees extending out from the house, which over time followed the river to its new course. Most of the Cheyenne was camped on by Native American tribes because of the water's high quality, especially in a part of the country where there was precious little of it.
    © Andrew Moore
  • Pedro, Sheridan County, Nebraska, 2013

    Pedro, Sheridan County, Nebraska, 2013
    Teodoro ("Pedro") Salazar Ucharima, who is originally from Peru, lives on horseback and in this wagon for four months a year while herding sheep along with two border collies. When he heads back home to visit his family, one of his two brothers takes over for him. Some ranchers look down on sheep herding, but the Terrells, for whom Pedro works, find it a highly efficient use of their land, as the sheep graze on different grasses than the cattle.
    © Andrew Moore