Wilderness to Wasteland by David T. Hanson (Taverner Press)
  • Yankee Doodle tailings pond, Butte Area Superfund site, Butte, Montana, 1986.

    Yankee Doodle tailings pond, Butte Area Superfund site, Butte, Montana, 1986.
    Over five years, David T. Hanson took landscape and aerial photographs documenting the transformation of the American landscape by our increasingly industrialized and militarized culture. The results are in Hanson's new book, <a href="http://www.artbook.com/9780692493724.html" target="external">"Wilderness to Wasteland,"</a> published by Taverner Press. Surrounded by one of the largest open-pit copper mines in the world, Butte is a part of the biggest Superfund hazardous waste site in the United States.
    Wilderness to Wasteland by David T. Hanson (Taverner Press)
  • East edge of Atomic City, Idaho, 1986.

    East edge of Atomic City, Idaho, 1986.
    Hanson also documented Atomic City, Idaho, site of the world's first nuclear power plant and first reactor meltdown.
    Wilderness to Wasteland by David T. Hanson (Taverner Press)
  • Fackrell's Texaco Store and Bar, Atomic City, Idaho, 1986.

    Fackrell's Texaco Store and Bar, Atomic City, Idaho, 1986.
    "I was interested in this former nuclear boomtown turned ghost town as yet another example of the boom-to-bust cycles that have characterized the history of the American West," said Hanson.
    Wilderness to Wasteland by David T. Hanson (Taverner Press)
  • Mt. Con Mine waste pile and remains of Corktown, Butte, Montana, 1985.

    Mt. Con Mine waste pile and remains of Corktown, Butte, Montana, 1985.
    As part of his project, he photographed the vast copper mines, housing and surrounding wasteland of Butte, Montana. This legendary mining town is now the location of the largest toxic waste site in the United States.
    Wilderness to Wasteland by David T. Hanson (Taverner Press)
  • Looking toward Los Angeles from Interstate 5, near Sylmar, California, 1985.

    Looking toward Los Angeles from Interstate 5, near Sylmar, California, 1985.
    "As I was creating all of these photographs, I saw them as monuments for the end of the twentieth century. In examining how dramatically the American landscape has been transformed in the past 150 years, they begin to reveal the new landscape that we have created and now inhabit," Hanson told ABC News.
    Wilderness to Wasteland by David T. Hanson (Taverner Press)
  • Ft. Worth-Dallas Club, next to the Pantex nuclear weapons plant, Carson County, Texas, 1985.

    Ft. Worth-Dallas Club, next to the Pantex nuclear weapons plant, Carson County, Texas, 1985.
    "Although these pictures were made thirty years ago, they seem even more relevant today, given our growing concerns about energy production, environmental degradation and climate change," said Hanson.
    Wilderness to Wasteland by David T. Hanson (Taverner Press)
  • Abandoned Union Carbide Lucky Mac uranium mine, Gas Hills, Fremont County, Wyoming, 1986.

    Abandoned Union Carbide Lucky Mac uranium mine, Gas Hills, Fremont County, Wyoming, 1986.
    "Displaying the dystopian side of progress, [the photographs] form an extended investigation into nature and culture, the real and ideal, order and entropy," Hanson told ABC News.
    Wilderness to Wasteland by David T. Hanson (Taverner Press)
  • Mt. Con Mine and Centerville, Butte, Montana, 1985.

    Mt. Con Mine and Centerville, Butte, Montana, 1985.
    "It seems likely that the most enduring monuments America will leave for future generations will be the hazardous remains of our industry and technology," said Hanson.
    Wilderness to Wasteland by David T. Hanson (Taverner Press)
  • Fading daylight along the Yellowstone River [Exxon Corporation, Billings, Montana], 1982.

    Fading daylight along the Yellowstone River [Exxon Corporation, Billings, Montana], 1982.
    "Landscapes of failed desire, these sites become both arena and metaphor for the most constructive and destructive aspects of the American spirit. The photographs become, finally, meditations on a ravaged landscape," wrote Hanson in an e-mail.
    Wilderness to Wasteland by David T. Hanson (Taverner Press)