How San Bernardino Shooters Were Hiding in Plain Sight

Neighbors and colleagues had few suspicions.

ByMeghan Keneally, Matt Gutman and Jennifer Harrison
December 04, 2015, 1:11 PM

— -- The home of the suspected mass shooters believed to be responsible for the San Bernardino, California, shooting this week looks like that of any family with a newborn.

One of the bedrooms upstairs was dedicated to the new addition to the family, as seen by cameras today allowed into the home of Syed Farook and wife Tashfeen Malik for the first time since the Wednesday attack, after which they died in a shootout with police.

The couple left their 6-month-old daughter with one of their mothers before allegedly going on the shooting rampage. The infant is no longer at the family's Redlands, California, home, but many of her toys remain behind.

A copy of a book with goodnight stories inspired by the Quran was also spotted inside the little girl's room.

PHOTO: FBI agents investigate a car near a home in connection to the shootings in San Bernardino, Dec. 3, 2015, in Redlands, Calif.
FBI agents investigate a car near a home in connection to the shootings in San Bernardino, Dec. 3, 2015, in Redlands, Calif.
Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP Photo

Everything appeared so normal that neighbors and colleagues of Farook, 28, and Malik, 29, say they had no idea the people living and working next to them were planning a deadly attack.

Farook's San Bernardino colleague and cubicle-mate, Patrick Baccari, said he had tried to connect with Farook but had little success.

PHOTO: An member of an FBI evidence response team walks over a destroyed door to enter a townhome in Redlands, Calif., Dec. 3, 2015, linked to the Dec. 2 shooting rampage in San Bernardino.
An member of an FBI evidence response team walks over a destroyed door to enter a townhome in Redlands, Calif., Dec. 3, 2015, linked to the Dec. 2 shooting rampage in San Bernardino.
Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

"I thought I made a connection with him, talking about preparing cars and things like that. Asking some of his experiences, things like that," Baccari told ABC News.

"Usually, I'd grate him and I wouldn't get anything back. It's like you're trying to initiate some conversation and it just doesn't perpetuate or get anywhere.”

One person who noted an uptick of activity at the couple's home the week before the attack was their loal UPS driver, who noted that Farook was unfriendly during one recent interaction.

The delivery man who worked the area, but asked not to be named, confirmed to ABC News he had delivered packages to the Redlands home as recently as late last week, just days before the Wednesday attack.

PHOTO: People gather in the neighborhood near the home in connection to the shootings in San Bernardino, Dec. 3, 2015, in Redlands, Calif.
People gather in the neighborhood near the home in connection to the shootings in San Bernardino, Dec. 3, 2015, in Redlands, Calif.
Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP Photo

Some days, the UPS driver noted, he would deliver over a dozen a day.

On one particular day last week, the driver said, Farook had to help him carry the packages in because there were so many. The driver said they were mostly light, bagged packages and many of them were from Target.

When the driver asked whether they were Christmas gifts, Farook glowered at the driver, he said.

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