'Start Here': Trump says 'Spygate' could be worse than 'Watergate'

PHOTO: President Donald Trump speaks to the media before boarding the Marine One helicopter on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, May 23, 2018.PlayJacquelyn Martin/AP
WATCH 'Start Here' podcast: 'Orbiting' is the new 'Ghosting'

It's Thursday, May 24, 2018. Here are some of the stories we're talking about on ABC News' new daily podcast, "Start Here."

1. 'Spygate'

It began with reports the FBI used an informant during the 2016 campaign, but on Wednesday President Donald Trump upped the ante by breaking out a term: "Spygate."

Trump went from asking on Twitter whether the FBI was trying to infiltrate his campaign to accusing the "criminal deep state" of getting caught in a "major spy scandal."

ABC News Chief White House Correspondent Jonathan Karl pressed the president on this topic on Wednesday, but he tells us: "The president's offering absolutely no details or evidence."

"Start Here" is a daily ABC News podcast hosted by Brad Mielke featuring original reporting on stories that are driving the national conversation. Listen for FREE on the ABC News app, Apple Podcasts, TuneIn, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Play Music, iHeartRadio -- or ask Alexa: "Play 'Start Here.'"

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2. Rules of the game

It started with a handful of NFL players kneeling during the national anthem, and then it became a national conversation after President Trump weighed in and called for players to stand.

Now the NFL has mandated it's against the rules to take a knee, but ABC News Legal Analyst and ESPN "Outside the Lines" co-host Ryan Smith tells us the rule change doesn't mean players can't protest.

PHOTO: Houston Texans players kneel and stand during the singing of the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks, Oct. 29, 2017, in Seattle. Elaine Thompson/AP
Houston Texans players kneel and stand during the singing of the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks, Oct. 29, 2017, in Seattle.

3. USC sex assault allegations

It rocked the campus and swamped local police.

Allegations that a gynecologist abused women at the University of Southern California are prompting a critical look at the school's entire administration.

Dr. George Tyndall -- who's spent 30 years at USC -- denies any wrongdoing.

ABC News' Kayna Whitworth spoke to a lawyer representing four women bringing a civil case against the doctor, and he believes this case will end up being much bigger than the case against Dr. Larry Nassar at Michigan State University.

PHOTO: The entrance to the Engemann Student Health Center on the campus of the University of Southern California (USC) is seen in Los Angeles, on May 17, 2018. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images
The entrance to the Engemann Student Health Center on the campus of the University of Southern California (USC) is seen in Los Angeles, on May 17, 2018.

4. Run like the Siberian wind

There are stories about people's shaping the world, then there are stories about the world's shaping people.

Alicja Barahona is an ultra-marathoner. It's a passion that led her to a new challenge: running a 26-mile marathon across a frozen lake in Siberia.

The bone-chilling temperatures and dangerous winds on the lake were so brutal, one frostbitten runner had to have part of his ear cut off.

By the way: Alicja is 64 years old.

PHOTO: Alicja Barahona runs the Baikal Ice Marathon on Lake Baikal, the deepest lake in the world. ABC News
Alicja Barahona runs the Baikal Ice Marathon on Lake Baikal, the deepest lake in the world.

5. The new 'ghosting'

You’ve heard of "ghosting" when someone completely cuts off contact after a date, but what about when that person still engages with your posts on social media?

Anna Rose Iovine was inspired by her own frustrating experience and came up with the term "orbiting."

PHOTO: A man is seen typing on a laptop computer in this undated stock photo. STOCK/Getty Images
A man is seen typing on a laptop computer in this undated stock photo.