New Wedding Trend Asks Guest to Arrive 'Unplugged'

Is it selfish to ask guests to arrive without phones or cameras? Dan Abrams breaks it down.
5:01 | 04/23/14

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Transcript for New Wedding Trend Asks Guest to Arrive 'Unplugged'
It is time for "Jury's out." I just went to my own interest. First, a new trend of what are called unplugged weddings. Guests are asked to leave their phones and cameras at the door, so they can enjoy the special moment distractions. My take. This sounds lovely. This sounds wonderful. But as a practical matter, I think it's really selfish. To say -- robin's getting going. I'm with you on this one. I think it is selfish to say to people, if they have kids at home, whatever, don't touch your devices. Keep them away, et cetera. It's wrong. What about checking in the cloak room? Exactly. It's somebody's wedding. They're talking 20 minutes for the actual ceremony? I know it varies. Come on. You can take pictures. Should you tell them, though? Like use common sense as a guest. And this is a very special moment. Wouldn't it be a terrible shame that your -- I'm not suggesting that people use the devices during the procedure. I'm saying the whole idea of unplugged weddings. Don't bring the cam -- don't bring this, just seems like over -- What's wrong with that? It's wonderful. There was a time that we didn't have this. You're right. So disconcerting to see someone using an iPhone in church. I like the idea of people saying don't post any pictures. That, I'm game with. That's up to the parties to decide. It was a funny episode of "Veep," though. That's right. I just want to say, I know you're going to say something about this. If you have children, I'm going to try to help you here, and you do have a child, as a parent, you need to have that handy. I know you said, you know -- I just wanted to say that. Okay. I got you. Thank you. I really appreciate that support. Someone else supports me here. I think it's a great idea. I have no problems with the bride throwing the stink eye to someone whose phone is going off and saying, really? Unless it's a celebrity wedding, I'd rather not be invited whether you dictate whether I bring my personal devices with me. Next, do you have to invite your boss to your wedding? If you get along with your boss, you have to extend an invitation, even if you are not close friends. I say, no. I say save the boss the hassle. I agree with you. She doesn't want to be invited, she's a loser. Well -- To that point, I was fine with you for once. Until that caveat. If you're not friends, I think it does let the boss off the hook. And the boss is going to send a gift. Let's go to the flash poll on this one. Do you have to invite your boss to your wedding? 19% said yes. 81% said no. Let me go back to social on this. Linda says, no. In fact, most cases the boss would rather not be invited so he/she doesn't have to pay, buy a gift or make an excuse not to go. I think it's good etiquette to extend an invitation. And if the boss is a loser. Think about it. The boss really wants to be invited to the wedding? What if he happens to like you? Your friends, that's different. If it's just a professional relationship -- am I really doing all of this to myself today? How about one more? On Friday, the esteemed "New York times" crossword provided the following clue for a nine-letter word. Here's the clue, definitely dawg -- d-a-w-g. The answer they were looking for has purists up in arm. The correct answer was fo shizzle. Yes, for real. Is it an unfair question when they said dawg as the clue? And the answer was fo shizzle? No. Snoop dog, isn't it? You're confident about it, right? Do we have time for the last one? Please. Please. Quick last topic. Ready? Tax day is behind us. How about a tax incentive to exercise? "The American journal of preventive medicine" did a study the best way to get people to exercise, is to offer cash. How about tax reductions for gym memberships? It would save billions in health care costs. How do you ensure they go to the gym? How about for the membership. I'm surprised it works. If it does, why not? I thought some people were offended by this. Are you disappointed that we're not? Yeah. Highly offensive, Dan. Highly offended by that topic.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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