What Should I Do If I Accidentally Spill A Chemical In My Eyes?

Question: What should I do if I accidentally spill a chemical in my eyes?

Answer: If you spill or splash a chemical in your eye, the first thing you need to do is wash it out. If you're at work, you can use the mandated eyewash stations. If you're at home, just find a way to get your eye under any source of running water -- the sink, the tub, or even get into the shower with all your clothes on if you have to. After you do that, the next thing to do is figure out what type of chemical actually splashed in your eye.

There are three main types. There's alkalized substances, like ammonia or lye that's in hair products. There are acids like nail polish removers or battery acid, and then there are irritants, which are most household chemicals which don't really do much to the eye; it just irritates it, like the name. After you finish washing it out, then you also need to look at your eye in the mirror. If you see a lot of redness, if you can't actually open your eye, if you have a lot of pain, or if your vision is still blurry, then you need to get it evaluated either by an eye doctor or go into the emergency room.

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