H1N1 and Election Day: What States Are Doing to Keep Voters Flu-Free

"We also have done a fairly large campaign about educating the voters – how to vote absentee, what are the qualifications so that that they wouldn't even have to come into the polling places on election day, should they so choose," Lee told ABC News.

In Wisconsin, voters may see a collection of medical masks, latex gloves, and signs reminding them of the flu pandemic as they interact with poll workers.

Wisconsin's elections division is "requiring thorough cleaning of their voting equipment and materials following contact by voters, the election inspectors are using alcohol-based wipes to clean marking pens and pencils and they are also spacing voters three feet apart in line at the polls to help as well," according to Beech.

In Maine, Governor John Baldacci has declared a civil emergency to help the state respond to widespread cases of H1N1, and in the Maine town of Lewiston, people with flu-like symptoms have been asked to stay away from polling places today.

Flu Concerns Keep Ill Voters Away From Polls

"Due to the recent outbreak in the city, we are working to put into place preventative measures for the protection of everyone who will be at the polls," said Lewiston's coordinator for H1N1 prevention, Assistant Fire Chief George Merrill, in a statement.

"We are trying to be cautious and prevent the spread of illness to the election workers and fellow voters of Lewiston," Merrill advised.

Lewiston has asked sick voters to use absentee ballots, which can be turned in by mail or dropped off by someone on the voter's behalf up until Saturday.

Lewiston, Maine, is also the home to Bates College where nearly 15 percent of the student body has had H1N1 symptoms this fall.

Maine voters will cast ballots today which will determine whether or not the state's gay marriage law, which passed the legislature last spring, will stand or be tossed out.

To stay healthy, voters today can wash their hands frequently with soap and water or, in the absence of hand-washing facilities, use alcohol-based sanitizers. Voters can also avoid touching their eyes, mouth or nose, which are common ways germs are spread.

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