Hangover 'Cures': What Helps and What Hurts

Pain Meds For a Hangover? Be Careful

Many people shuffle to the medicine cabinet the first thing of a hangover morning, but that doesn't mean your usual pain medicine will be safe. Acetaminophen products (such as Tylenol) can have dangerous interactions with alcohol, according to the American Liver Foundation.

However, taking anti-inflammation pain medicines such as ibuprofen, naproxen or mefenamic acid can help the headache.

In fact, these drugs, called NSAIDS, may actually help prevent hangovers in some people, according to Saper and Grosberg. The drugs work by inhibiting a hormone called prostaglandin, which is released during drinking and cause nausea and headaches the next day.

"Although that should be done in conjunction with speaking to your doctor," said Grosberg.

The water you drink with the pills will also help rehydrate you. Alcohol is so dehydrating that doctors recommend drinking not just water, but something with minerals and electrolytes either before or after your hangover.

Some hangover sufferers have say that Gatorade helps, as does those Pedialyte Freezer Pops which are designed to rehydrate children suffering from diarrhea. Grosberg said drinking or eating these may very well help before or after the hangover begins.

However, one of the most frequent misconceptions about what to eat on a hangover morning is to try a big, greasy breakfast.

Big Greasy Breakfast to Cure a Hangover?

Always order a bacon and egg sandwich or home fries the next day after a hangover? Doctors say grease can help delay the absorption of alcohol and therefore protect against a hangover.

But, "I think eating it after the hangover -- you've probably already missed the time to slow down or delay the effects of the alcohol," said Grosberg.

Instead of waiting until the day after to address the hangover, Grosberg recommends moderate drinking and prevention.

"All of it is acting on prevention, jumping on it quicker," he said.

Before you go out partying again, he also reminds people that it doesn't always take a lot of drinking to get a hangover.

"Usually, the hangover headache isn't dose-related. The hangover is much more common in people who drink light to moderate amounts and indulge than people who drink a lot, frequently," said Grosberg.

"If you don't drink a lot all day and you indulge, you're more likely to get a hangover than if you drink often and throw back a few more one night," he said.

-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 9457713. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 9457713. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 9457713. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 9457713. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 9457713. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 9457713. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 9457713. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 9457713.
Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
  • |
  • 3
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...