Nurse Whistle-Blower Not Guilty for Reporting Doctor

Arafiles was also prohibited from supervising physician assistants or advanced nurse practitioners.

According to that order, Arafiles supervised a physician assistant and oversaw the protocol for using phentermine -- an appetite suppressant and amphetamine -- for treatment of obesity that can cause hypertension.

The board said that he only spent 5 percent of his professional time at the clinic and did not "adequately document the physician assistant's efforts to counsel patients, regarding other, healthier treatments for obesity, other than medicine."

But, Arafiles' lawyer insisted, "The town has not heard the whole story."

"The only side of the story that the town has heard is that these are sisters of mercy, missionaries of peace," prosecutor Scott M. Tidwell told The New York Times.

"If you look at every Gallup Poll, nurses come out No. 1 in public trust and ethics every year except 2001, when it was the firefighters," Charles Idelson, spokesman for the California Nursing Association, which had been carefully watching the case, told ABCNews.com.

"The reason for that is when you are in a hospital bed and vulnerable, you can count on a nurse to the advocate for you."

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