Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • Inside a Lower East Side housing project, a family of seven children spent most of their lives in confinement from the outside world. "We were forbidden to communicate with anybody unless we were told otherwise," Narayana Angulo told ABC News' Elizabeth Vargas. Narayana lived there with his oldest and only sister Visnu, his twin brother Govinda, and his other brothers Bhagavan, Mukunda, Krisna and Jagadesh. But their mom Susanne , pictured here as a teen, had a different childhood growing up in Indiana.
    Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • As a child, Susanne spent hours roaming through acres of corn fields in Indiana. When she was older, she travelled to Machu Picchu in 1989 where she met Oscar Angulo, pictured here. Oscar was a musician and Hare Krishna devotee from Peru. "I noticed right away he was like very sensitive, and also he had like this kind of like an expansive mind," Susanne told "20/20."
    Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • After Susanne and Oscar married, they eventually moved to New York. There they lived with their seven children in a 16th floor apartment. Oscar did not work, and the family was on welfare. Their only income was money Susanne earned from the city for homeschooling the six boys and Visnu, who was born with special needs from a rare genetic disorder.
    Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • Oscar held the only key to the front door, which he kept blocked by a tall ladder to keep intruders out and his family in. Though the apartment had six rooms, the children were forbidden from entering two of them because the walls adjoined the neighbors' walls. "He didn't want anyone to hear what we were doing or that we were laughing or, he basically didn't want anyone to know we were here," Mukunda told "20/20."
    Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • The children's only view of the world was through Susanne's memories of the life she used to have. She encouraged them to fantasize a world outside their cramped apartment. "Every day I wished for that-was to be out in nature with my Mom, learning about the web of life and the connection of everything," Narayana said.
    Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • "Sometimes it was hard because I thought, I wanted them to be out in the fresh air because that's what I did as a child," Susanne said. "When my children were younger, we would sit and look out the window. And I could compare it to the view on a mountaintop. Those big buildings might be other mountains."
    Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • As the children grew older, their prison became even more extreme. Their father taped over windows in the apartment temporarily, blocking out the outside world entirely. When this happened, Mukunda said they couldn't even get sunlight looking out the window.
    Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • Oscar allowed rare field trips outside, where the children were closely supervised, told where to look, how far to walk and never talked to strangers. "We would go out in the summer mostly 'cause it was nice out," Govinda told "20/20." There were years when the children went out five times a year, and other years they only left their apartment once. "We never went out in the winter," Jagadesh (now Eddie) told "20/20."
    Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • The one privilege their father allowed was movies, which the boys said they watched all day, every day. "They were like a door into another world," Narayana said. With no outside friends or activities, the boys said they watched thousands of movies together. The boys later decided to become a part of their favorite films, transcribing every word into handwritten scripts. They then memorized every line, hand gesture and expression, assigned each other parts and reenacted movie scenes. The brothers appear here in a still from the documentary, "The Wolfpack."
    Magnolia Pictures
  • Mukunda was the brothers' main prop master and would spend weeks creating costumes from anything he gets his hands on. "When we do it, I have to get into the mind of the character. It's a responsibility," Mukunda said. "That might sound pathetic but for us it's very personal." Mukunda wears a costume he made himself in a still from the documentary, "The Wolfpack."
    Magnolia Pictures
  • In January 2010, Mukunda, pictured on the far right with Krisna, Narayana and Govinda, finally left the apartment on his own. "It starts to reach like a volcano point where something is starting to erupt," Mukunda said. "It was tense," Bhagavan told "20/20." Mukunda's trip outside helped the rest of the brothers break free after 14 years of confinement.
    Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • When they went outside their apartment without their dad for the first time in April 2010, the youngest brother was 11 years old, and the oldest was 18 years old. They traveled as a pack and didn't stray far from home. In April 2010, during their first week out, filmmaker Crystal Moselle spotted them. "I just instinctually ran after them," Moselle told "20/20." Soon Moselle started filming them, which she did for almost five years. The footage became her documentary, "The Wolfpack." which won a Grand Jury Prize at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival and was shown at the Tribeca Film Festival.
    Araya Diaz/Getty Images
  • With each new experience outside and with Moselle, the brothers became further separated from their father, who is pictured here with their mother. Jagadesh, the youngest, changed his name to Eddie, and Krisna changed his name to Glenn. Four of the brothers cut off their long hair. Susanne changed her last name from Angulo back to her maiden name. "I feel like I'm reclaiming who I am and who I always was," Susanne said. "In some ways I have regrets, but in many ways it's been a journey for me. And I feel like it's been a learning process and so I can't discount any part of it."
    Courtesy Susanne Reisenbichler
  • For 20 years, Susanne made no contact with her family. "There was no address, no phone number," her sister Joyce told "20/20." I figured she was in some kind of situation that she couldn't get out of." In May 2015, ABC News' "20/20" brought Susanne and her children to Three Oaks, Michigan, for a family reunion. The children met their mom's family, including Susanne's mother, for the first time. The brothers are pictured here with their mother, grandmother and sister.
    ABC News
  • Susanne remains married to Oscar, who did not respond to requests for comment from "20/20." As of June 2015, the family still lived in the apartment together, except for Govinda, who moved to Brooklyn. Govinda is a camera assistant and director of photography. Narayana works at New York Public Interest Research Group, and Bhagavan is a yoga instructor and attends the Hip-Hop Dance Conservatory. Mukunda is an on-set production assistant at All Day Every Day, while Glenn and Eddie are aspiring musicians who love 80's music and culture.
    ABC News