Less than a year after having a baby, Serena Williams fell just short of winning Wimbledon.

The tennis star lost the championship Saturday in a stunning straight-sets match to Angelique Kerber.

Kerber, who was ranked No. 11, beat Williams 6-3, 6-3 in just over an hour at the women's single final at the All England Club in Wimbledon, London. Williams was vying for an eighth career Wimbledon title, after missing the Grand Slam tennis tournament last year while pregnant.

"I was really happy to get this far," a visibly emotional Williams said in a post-match interview. "For all the moms out there, I was playing for you today and I tried, but Angelique played really well."

Serena Williams of U.S appears dejected during the Ladies' Singles final against Angelique Kerber of Germany on day 12 of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 14, 2018 in London.(Michael Steele/Getty Images) Serena Williams of U.S appears dejected during the Ladies' Singles final against Angelique Kerber of Germany on day 12 of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 14, 2018 in London.

Williams struck the ball into the net during the final point, and Kerber fell on the grass court in a show of victory. The two hugged from across the net after the game.

It's Kerber's first Wimbledon title and third Grand Slam title in her tennis career.

Williams, 36, had last faced Kerber, 30, in the 2016 Wimbledon final, where she was victorious.

"You're such an inspiration for everybody," Kerber said to Williams during her post-match interview Saturday. "Congrats again for coming back."

Germany's Angelique Kerber returns the ball to U.S. player Serena Williams during their women's singles final match on the day 12 of the 2018 Wimbledon Championships at All England Lawn Tennis Club in London, July 14, 2018.(Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images) Germany's Angelique Kerber returns the ball to U.S. player Serena Williams during their women's singles final match on the day 12 of the 2018 Wimbledon Championships at All England Lawn Tennis Club in London, July 14, 2018.

It was Williams' 10th final at the All England Club. A win would have tied her with Margaret Court's all-time record of 24 Grand Slam titles.

Williams was ranked No. 1 in the world when she took her maternity leave before welcoming a daughter in September with her then-fiance, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian. The couple wed in an intimate ceremony in New Orleans three months later.

She was ranked No. 183 after returning to the pro tour in March.

"Unfortunately, in the '90s they changed the rule whereas if you were injured [and] then you come back, you lose your seeding," Williams told ABC News' "Good Morning America" during an interview last month in New York City.

"But they never took into account women that left No. 1" due to pregnancy, she added. "And left not for an injury, but to have a great life and not give up tennis, but to come back."

Serena Williams of the U.S. returns a ball to Angelique Kerber of Germany during the women's singles final match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships, in London, July 14, 2018.(Andrew Couldridge, Pool via AP) Serena Williams of the U.S. returns a ball to Angelique Kerber of Germany during the women's singles final match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships, in London, July 14, 2018.

Williams played unseeded at the French Open in Paris in May, eventually pulling out of the Grand Slam tournament in the fourth round due to an injury.

She was seeded No. 25 in Wimbledon this year after the All England Club amended the rules and ranked her in the tournament, instead of following the ranking list that doesn't take into account players' going on maternity leave.

Speaking to reporters after Saturday's match, Williams again praised her opponent's game, saying Kerber played "unbelievable." She also explained that she was unsure "how I would be able to come back" after taking time off to be a new mom, and that making it to the Wimbledon final was a "great opportunity."

"It was such a long way to see light at the end of the road," Williams said.