Danielle Villasana
  • On April 14, 2014, 300 schoolgirls in the Chibok village in Nigeria were kidnapped by the terrorist group, Boko Haram. Two years later, the majority of these girls are still missing. According to the Global Terrorism Index Report 2015, Boko Haram, which operates mainly in Nigeria, has become the most deadly terrorist group in the world. Photojournalist Danielle Villasana traveled to Northeastern Nigeria to document the aftermath of Boko Haram violence. Pictured, an abandoned tank left by Boko Haram, Feb. 20, 2016, seen on the road to Michika, a town formerly occupied by the insurgents.
    Danielle Villasana
  • In a report published by the United Nations World Food Programme, Denise Brown, WFP regional director for West Africa, states, “No one is untouched by the Boko Haram violence. Across the borders, farmers, fishermen, cross-border traders and herders have suffered significant losses. Crises involving refugees, displaced people, food and nutrition are converging on the poorest parts of West Africa.” People in Michika, a town formerly occupied by Boko Haram, wait for a food distribution, Feb. 20, 2016.
    Danielle Villasana
  • Fati Isa, 22, became a widow when her husband was killed by Boko Haram. Though she remarried, she separated from her second husband because he was not able to take care of her and her child. She now lives in Maiduguri with her mother and sister, all of whom are widowed. This photograph was taken on March 27, 2016.
    Danielle Villasana
  • A man looks at a bomb blast site at the Jimeta Police Station in Yola. The Commissioner of Police in Adamawa, Mr. Mohammed Gazali, confirmed to reporters that the blast at the Jimeta Police Station was caused by bombs recovered from Boko Haram insurgents, according to Vanguard News in Nigeria. The Nigeria Emergency Management Agency confirmed four policemen were killed by the blast and an unspecified number of others were injured.
    Danielle Villasana
  • A 3-month old boy recovers from wounds sustained after a Boko Haram attack on the town of Dolori in Maiduguri's Borno State Specialist Hospital, Feb. 27, 2016. The boy’s mother was killed in the same attack.
    Danielle Villasana
  • The Kudzum Bridge on the road to the village of Michika in northern Nigeria's Adamawa State was damaged, according to the Premium Times based in Nigeria, by Boko Haram while they occupied the territory to prevent the Nigerian military from advancing. Now liberated from Boko Haram, the bridge remains damaged, making it difficult for large shipment trucks to carry goods to villages in northern Nigeria, Feb. 20, 2016.
    Danielle Villasana
  • 29-year-old Mariam Joseph, from Baga in northern Nigeria, was kidnapped by Boko Haram along with around 140 women, including her sister. Though she was kidnapped with her baby twins and toddler son, her twins died under captivity. She was kept in a village for around nine months and treated like a slave, cooking and cleaning for Boko Haram's wives. She also witnessed the insurgents kill people right in front of her. Joseph escaped with her son after being told she had to marry an insurgent. This photograph was taken on March 27, 2016.
    Danielle Villasana
  • Maiduguri's Borno State Specialist Hospital has 33 beds and 29 were occupied by bomb blast and gun shot wound victims due to Boko Haram violence when this photograph was taken on Feb. 27, 2016.
    Danielle Villasana
  • Aisha Abba, 45, was abducted after Boko Haram stormed a school in Dikwa where her husband was a teacher. Along with many women, she was taken to the Sambisa Forest in northern Nigeria after they killed the men, including her husband. She lived with her two children in the forest for around four months. She was rescued by the military, but they were unable to rescue her children, who still remain with Boko Haram. Her goal is to find a way to get everyone under the same roof again. This photograph was taken on March 26, 2016.
    Danielle Villasana
  • Imam Dauda Bello, left, and Bishop Stephen Ransom, right, walk towards reconciliation meetings in Michika, a town in northern Nigeria formerly occupied by Boko Haram, Feb. 20, 2016. Bello and Ransom are members of the Adamawa Peacemakers Initiative that formed in 2012 in response to rising post-conflict religious and ethnic tensions in northeastern Nigeria. To learn more about this story <a href="http://www.daniellevillasana.com/home-of-peace" target="external">click here</a>.
    Danielle Villasana
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