Romain Veillon
  • <a href="http://romainveillon.com/" target="_blank">Romain Veillon</a> has been intrigued by abandoned places since a very young age. Driven by a curiosity and a want to explore, he started visiting some.
    Romain Veillon
  • “I loved to wander in an old castle near my school or in the warehouses that used to belong to my grandmother,” Veillon, 31, of Paris, told ABC News. “Every time I saw an old farm or factory, I had to see what I could find there.”
    Romain Veillon
  • With every new rundown place he saw, his curiosity piqued.
    Romain Veillon
  • “I remember that maybe once a week, I passed in front of the Molitor swimming pool and that I would kill to see what was inside, a dream I reached a few years later just before it was renovated,” he said.
    Romain Veillon
  • Each place has a story, Veillon says, which is why he continues to seek out areas he has not visited.
    Romain Veillon
  • “You can try to imagine what stories hide behind every object and what was the life or the work of these people,” he said. “I feel like I am the last witness of a slice of a time soon lost forever.”
    Romain Veillon
  • Once he started visiting vacant buildings, his interest continued to grow. Veillon then decided to document his discoveries, as well as travel to visit places all over.
    Romain Veillon
  • “Photography became equally important as the exploration itself [sic],” he said. “I was also fascinated by the architectural history, I started to have an esthetic approach of the chaos that emerges from decay; especially playing with the light to bring back life in these places forgotten by everybody.”
    Romain Veillon
  • Veillon was not taught how to shoot and had not considered himself a photographer. He started to pick up photography because he wanted to bring back memories from where he traveled.
    Romain Veillon
  • Meeting people that had a passion for exploration and held an artistic view also helped him grow his creative hobby.
    Romain Veillon
  • While searching for places, he found others who shared his love to visit these old places. “With time, you also make friends who can help you in your search for decay,” he said. “With time you also make friends who can help you in your search for decay,” he said. “Some people I never met also contact me just to tell they have an abandoned building near their home or work."
    Romain Veillon
  • After years of delving into deteriorated architecture he trained his eye to see in a new way.
    Romain Veillon
  • Since gathering quite a bit of work he has begun working with a gallery in Paris to have a show. He is also has contacts in publishing, so a book is always a possibility.
    Romain Veillon
  • Getting published or having a gallery is not what keeps him searching for blighted buildings. “Exploring abandoned place is fascinating to me mostly because it makes you travel in time,” he said.
    Romain Veillon
  • “The thing is that I really want to stay focus on what I love, discovering and shooting abandoned historic places around the world,” he said. “Places that tell a story." More of Romain's work can be found on his <a href="https://www.facebook.com/veillonromain" target="_blank">Facebook page</a>.
    Romain Veillon