Hillary Clinton Releases 2015 Tax Returns as Tim Kaine Releases 10 Years' Worth

PHOTO: Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and Democratic vice presidential candidate, Sen. Tim Kaine look to the audience as they finish speaking during a rally at Temple University in Philadelphia, July 29, 2016.PlayAndrew Harnik/AP Photo
WATCH Hillary Clinton Releases 2015 Tax Returns

Hillary Clinton today released her 2015 tax returns while running mate Sen. Tim Kaine released 10 years’ worth of his.

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The information shows that she and husband Bill Clinton paid an effective federal tax rate of 34.2 percent and an effective state and local tax rate of 9 percent, totaling a combined tax rate of 43.2 percent for last year, according to the Clinton campaign. For the federal taxes alone, the couple paid $3.6 million.

The Clintons' 2015 joint tax return shows that their adjusted gross income was $10.6 million. That marks a significant drop from the year before when their adjusted gross income was $27.9 million in 2014. The drop is largely because Hillary Clinton stopped giving paid speeches when she launched her presidential campaign.

Clinton released her tax returns last year from 2007 to 2014. They are already listed on her campaign's website. Today's release is to include the 2015 returns on that list.

During the 2007 to 2014 period, the Clintons paid roughly $57 million in federal and state taxes on an income of more than $140 million over those years. Hillary Clinton made most of her income after leaving the State Department by giving paid speeches averaging $250,000 each.

Because of her previous presidential run and her husband's presidential administrations, the couple has previously released their tax returns dating back to 1977.

Charitable Donations to Their Family's Foundation

From 2007 to 2015, the Clintons gave roughly $16 million to charity. Of that, at least $15.8 million was to the Clinton Family Foundation. The foundation donates to a variety of charities including the Hillary Bill and Chelsea Clinton Foundation, which is a separate entity.

The remaining $232,450 was given to other organizations, but even some of those groups had ties to the Clinton Foundation.

For instance, in 2015, the Clintons donated only to the Clinton Foundation and to Desert Classic Charities. Desert Classic is described as a "local nonprofit that organizes the CareerBuilder Challenge in partnership with the Clinton Foundation."

Reading Through Kaine's Tax History

PHOTO: Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Tim Kaine visits Hillary Clintons campaign office on Wealthy Street in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Aug. 5, 2016. Allison Farrand/The Grand Rapids Press-MLive.com via AP
Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Tim Kaine visits Hillary Clinton's campaign office on Wealthy Street in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Aug. 5, 2016.

Kaine's returns show that he and his wife, consultant Anne Holton, had a combined effective federal, state and local tax rates ranged from 18.7 percent to 29.1 percent.

The Kaines paid lower effective federal tax rates than the Clintons—ranging from 13.4 percent in 2009 to 24 percent in 2011—partly because they made less money, and partly because they claimed their children as dependents, bumping up their deductions and lowering their total taxes paid.

Between 2006 and 2015, the Kaines gave between 4.4 percent and 12 percent of his gross income to charity. In 2012, the Kaines took a $1,500 education tax credit, typical for anyone paying for postsecondary education.

Kaine and his wife, who filed their taxes jointly, had a gross income of $313,441 in 2015.

In 2011, Holton made $106,224 from her work as a consultant to the Annie B. Casey Foundation.

Trump's Tax Returns Still Private

Donald Trump has repeatedly refused to release his tax returns because he claims he is being audited.

"There's nothing to learn from them," Trump told The Associated Press in an interview in May.

That same month, when asked on "Good Morning America" about his tax rate, he said, "It's none of your business. You'll see when I release, but I fight very hard to pay as little as possible."

He also said he does not believe the public has a right to see his tax returns before the election.