Sen. Amy Klobuchar shares update on husband, after he was hospitalized for coronavirus

The Minnesota senator says his health has taken a "good turn."

March 26, 2020, 5:51 PM

Sen. Amy Klobuchar announced in an official statement on Thursday that her husband, John Bessler, has been released from the hospital and is recovering at home after testing positive for the coronavirus.

Klobuchar says his health has taken a "good turn," and thanked the health care workers that were involved with his recovery.

"Thanks to all who sent kind words and prayers for my husband John," she said.

The day after revealing her husband had been infected by COVID-19, Klobuchar provided an update, saying he was still on oxygen.

He had been suffering from a bleeding cough and "dangerously low" oxygen levels, the Minnesota senator told Good Morning America host Robin Roberts on Tuesday.

Klobuchar said one of the hardest things about the disease is "you can't go and visit your loved one."

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"All you can do is call, email and text and try to reach the caretakers who are taking care of him ... to get updates," Klobuchar said.

PHOTO: Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks with "Good Morning America" about the coronavirus outbreak, March 24, 2020.
Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks with "Good Morning America" about the coronavirus outbreak, March 24, 2020.
ABC News

Bessler started to feel sick almost two weeks ago and immediately self-quarantined in his apartment, as coronavirus concerns began to grow, Klobuchar said. But given that Bessler, 52, was healthy and had no pre-existing health conditions, she said she wasn't sure how he contracted the virus.

While he took the test last Wednesday, Klobuchar said he received the results on Monday.

"We suspected over the weekend that he had it, and that’s the story of a lot of people," she said.

Klobuchar did not self-quarantine because she was in Minnesota while her husband was in Washington, D.C., adding that they were separate for at least the two weeks.

"By the time I came back for votes, he was starting to feel sick, so we stayed in separate places," she told Roberts. "So by the time we got the test back, the 14 days had gone by."

PHOTO: Then-Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar takes the stage with spouse John Bessler during a primary night event at the Grappone Conference Center, Feb. 11, 2020 in Concord, N.H.
Then-Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar takes the stage with spouse John Bessler during a primary night event at the Grappone Conference Center, Feb. 11, 2020 in Concord, N.H.
Scott Eisen/Getty Images, FILE

She added that she hasn't shown symptoms of the virus and was advised by her doctor to not get tested -- as she would likely not qualify for the test "no matter what."

"Why would I get a test when other people who are sick aren’t getting tests?" she said. "I’m going to be treated like everyone else."

Klobuchar explained that the many Americans that have contracted the virus have "worse going on."

“It’s all Americans … this isn’t just my story,” the senator added.

She told Roberts that she will continue to work from her office, saying she's devoting her time to getting the funding Americans need during this time of economic emergency.

"Everyone here has been working around the clock to get the bill done," she said of the $2 trillion stimulus package "We are very hopeful this morning."

The economic relief bill -- passed by the Senate late Wednesday -- aims to boost the economy to help American workers and businesses survive the pandemic.

PHOTO: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin talks briefly with reporters after arriving at the Capitol with White House Director of Legislative Affairs Eric Ueland and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, March 24, 2020 in Washington.
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin talks briefly with reporters after arriving at the Capitol with White House Director of Legislative Affairs Eric Ueland and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows to continue negotiations on a $2 trillion economic stimulus in response to the coronavirus pandemic, March 24, 2020 in Washington.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

"We have stuck together to try to push for more funding for medical surge, for equipment and hospitals," Klobuchar said.

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