The top awkward body language moments from Trump's first trip abroad

From handshakes to hand swats, Trump's trip had some awkward body language.

With the world’s spotlight fixed on President Trump during his first trip abroad, every handshake, thumbs-up, smile, and shove has been analyzed by viewers around the world. And at times, Trump's body language has seemed painfully awkward.

For his part, Trump has shown an awareness about the importance of adhering to foreign customs. While touring Murabba Palace in Saudi Arabia, Trump turned to King Salman while enjoying a pastry and tea to ask, “Always use the right hand, right? Always use the right.” In Islam, eating or greeting with the left hand can be interpreted as disrespectful.

But while Trump appears to have avoided any serious errors in following local customs during his travels, he has come under scrutiny for sometimes awkward or forceful body language that could send mixed messages to an international community eager to understand the new U.S. president and how his “America First” policies will impact other countries.

From handshakes to hand swats, here are the top four awkward body language moments from Trump’s first trip abroad.

First Lady <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/topics/news/us/melania-trump.htm" id="ramplink_Melania Trump_" target="_blank">Melania Trump</a> swats away President Trump’s hand

Upon disembarking from Air Force One in Israel, President Trump reached for First Lady Melania Trump’s hand as they made their way down the red carpet with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife, Sara. But the first lady appeared to swat Trump’s hand away in an awkward moment that was widely interpreted as a show of tension between the president and his wife. Aside from that moment of possible chilliness, the two were seen holding hands throughout their trip.

French President <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/topics/news/world/emmanuel-macron.htm" id="ramplink_Emmanuel Macron_" target="_blank">Emmanuel Macron</a> asserts his political power with white-knuckled handshake

Before heading to NATO meetings in Brussels, President Trump and the newly elected president of France, Emmanuel Macron, engaged in a jaw-clenching, white-knuckled handshake that lasted almost six seconds. Trump tried to pull his hand away, but the young French president persisted, perhaps in an effort to assert his political power.

President Macron appears to swerve away from President Trump

Later in the day, Macron met with NATO members on the red carpet as the group gathered for a special ceremony for the unveiling of the Article 5 and Berlin Wall memorials at NATO headquarters. But as Macron approached the other leaders, he appeared to swerve away from Trump to instead embrace German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Trump stood by waiting for his opportunity to greet the French president, and when the two shook hands again, it was equally forceful. Trump pulled Macron's hand close, and Macron laughed as he patted Trump on the arm.

President Trump pushes Montenegro’s prime minister out of the way at <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/topics/news/nato-summit.htm" id="ramplink_NATO Summit_" target="_blank">NATO Summit</a>

Trump met with backlash after he pushed Prime Minister Dusko Markovic out of the way as NATO leaders gathered for a group photo.

Trump grabbed the right arm of a surprised Markovic before pushing his way to the front of the group. The moment went viral and was met by criticism online from people who saw the move as undiplomatic.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer explained to reporters that the standing order at the photo was predetermined.

The leader of the United States typically stands at the front and center of the so-called “family photos," and in the past, President Obama has been in the front row.

Shortly before the photo was taken, Trump had scolded NATO leaders he thought had been falling short of meeting the financial obligations of member states.