Sean Spicer: President Trump 'believes that Mike Flynn should go testify'

PHOTO: Michael Flynn attends a press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the White House, Feb. 10, 2017. PlayJim Lo Scalzo/EPA
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White House press secretary Sean Spicer said today that President Trump "believes that Mike Flynn should go testify" in the congressional investigations into Russian meddling in the election.

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Earlier today Trump encouraged his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, to seek immunity as a condition for speaking with investigators from one of the two committees looking into Russian involvement in the 2016 election.

“Mike Flynn should ask for immunity in that this is a witch hunt (excuse for big election loss), by media & Dems, of historic proportion!” the president tweeted this morning.

Spicer told reporters that Trump wants Flynn to "go testify, go get it out there, do what you have to do."

"Take whatever precaution you want or whatever legal action you wanted to," he added.

When asked if the president was concerned that Flynn may reveal something, Spicer replied, "nope."

In a written statement, Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, says Flynn’s request for immunity is a “grave and momentous step” and the committee will discuss the matter with the Department of Justice and the Senate Intelligence Committee. Schiff added that it is premature to consider any sort of immunity until his requests for documents are fulfilled.

Trump's tweet this morning comes months after he hammered aides of Hillary Clinton, his Democratic challenger, on the campaign trail for seeking immunity in exchange for their testimony in the investigation of Clinton's use of a private email server while she was serving as secretary of state.

“The reason they get immunity is because they did something wrong, if they didn’t do anything wrong, they don’t think in terms of immunity,” he said as a presidential candidate.

According to Flynn's lawyer Robert Kelner, Flynn is seeking “assurances against unfair prosecution” and is in discussions to testify in the congressional investigations.

“General Flynn has a story to tell, and he very much wants to tell it, should the circumstances permit,” said Kelner.

Flynn was fired by President Trump in February after revelations that he had misled Vice President Mike Pence and other administration officials about his conversations with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak.

The president has called the Russia investigations "fake news" and blasted the media after Flynn's resignation for treating him "very, very unfairly."

"I think it's really a sad thing he was treated so badly," Trump said, calling Flynn a "wonderful man."