Trump fans flames about alleged 'spy' within campaign while top lawyer tamps them down

President Trump is accusing the DOJ of planting a spy in his 2016 campaign.

In a pair of tweets Friday morning, Trump appeared to refer to right-leaning news outlets that have questioned whether the FBI had actually planted a source in the Trump campaign in order to gather information about it, but he left unclear exactly what story or sourcing backed those claims.

“Apparently the DOJ put a Spy in the Trump Campaign. This has never been done before and by any means necessary, they are out to frame Donald Trump for crimes he didn’t commit.” David Asman @LouDobbs @GreggJarrett Really bad stuff!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 18, 2018,

Reports are there was indeed at least one FBI representative implanted, for political purposes, into my campaign for president. It took place very early on, and long before the phony Russia Hoax became a “hot” Fake News story. If true - all time biggest political scandal!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 18, 2018

On Thursday, Trump made a similar allegation in a tweet seemingly appearing to reference a National Review columnist.

DOJ spokeswoman Sarah Isgur Flores offered no comment when reached by ABC News about the president's claims on Twitter.

The claims from the president and his allies come as The Washington Post has reported that top White House officials agreed to back the DOJ’s efforts to resist turning over certain documents to Congress so as not to reveal the identity of a U.S. citizen-- who has provided intelligence to the CIA and FBI--because doing so might put lives at risk.

“I think we’re going to have to look into whether we can challenge the legitimacy of this entire investigation,” he said on Fox News. “Maybe the special counsel never should have been appointed.”

But on Friday morning, amid Trump's tweets, the former New York City mayor told CNN that the president didn't know "for sure" if there was a spy on his campaign.

“I don’t know for sure, nor does the president, if there really was one,” he said.

“They believed Chris's information might be credible because they had other intelligence that indicated the same thing and one of those pieces of intelligence was a human source from inside the Trump organization,” Simpson said.

"Disclosure of responsive information to such requests can risk severe consequences, including potential loss of human lives, damage to relationships with valued international partners, compromise of ongoing criminal investigations, and interference with intelligence activities," Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd said in the letter, which also claimed that the White House supported the Justice Department's decision to withhold the information.

“What we’re trying to do is get the documents to figure out, did they actually have, what methods were used to open this counterintelligence investigation,” Nunes said on “Fox and Friends” this week.

Meadows and Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, recently met with White House chief of staff John Kelly over concerns about the pace of DOJ disclosures to Congress.

“I can tell you that the president has been consistent about wanting greater transparency and so I don’t know that this would be at odds with what he’s been espousing for a number of months,” Meadows told ABC News on Thursday.

The Justice Department has repeatedly resisted requests to turn over information regarding the source, citing national security concerns.

FBI Director Chris Wray, speaking at a Senate Appropriations Committee hearing Wednesday, defended the agency’s approach to congressional oversight requests, amid the tension with House Republicans.

“As anybody in the intelligence community knows, human sources in particular who put themselves at great risk to work with us and with our foreign partners have to be able to trust that we're going to protect their identities and, in many cases, their lives and lives of their families,” he said. “The day that we can't protect human sources is the day the American people start becoming less safe.”

ABC's Devin Dwyer contributed to this report.

“Apparently the DOJ put a Spy in the Trump Campaign. This has never been done before and by any means necessary, they are out to frame Donald Trump for crimes he didn’t commit.” David Asman @LouDobbs @GreggJarrett Really bad stuff!

Reports are there was indeed at least one FBI representative implanted, for political purposes, into my campaign for president. It took place very early on, and long before the phony Russia Hoax became a “hot” Fake News story. If true - all time biggest political scandal!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 18, 2018

On Thursday, Trump made a similar allegation in a tweet seemingly appearing to reference a National Review columnist.

DOJ spokeswoman Sarah Isgur Flores offered no comment when reached by ABC News about the president's claims on Twitter.

The claims from the president and his allies come as The Washington Post has reported that top White House officials agreed to back the DOJ’s efforts to resist turning over certain documents to Congress so as not to reveal the identity of a U.S. citizen-- who has provided intelligence to the CIA and FBI--because doing so might put lives at risk.

“I think we’re going to have to look into whether we can challenge the legitimacy of this entire investigation,” he said on Fox News. “Maybe the special counsel never should have been appointed.”

But on Friday morning, amid Trump's tweets, the former New York City mayor told CNN that the president didn't know "for sure" if there was a spy on his campaign.

“I don’t know for sure, nor does the president, if there really was one,” he said.

“They believed Chris's information might be credible because they had other intelligence that indicated the same thing and one of those pieces of intelligence was a human source from inside the Trump organization,” Simpson said.

"Disclosure of responsive information to such requests can risk severe consequences, including potential loss of human lives, damage to relationships with valued international partners, compromise of ongoing criminal investigations, and interference with intelligence activities," Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd said in the letter, which also claimed that the White House supported the Justice Department's decision to withhold the information.

“What we’re trying to do is get the documents to figure out, did they actually have, what methods were used to open this counterintelligence investigation,” Nunes said on “Fox and Friends” this week.

Meadows and Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, recently met with White House chief of staff John Kelly over concerns about the pace of DOJ disclosures to Congress.

“I can tell you that the president has been consistent about wanting greater transparency and so I don’t know that this would be at odds with what he’s been espousing for a number of months,” Meadows told ABC News on Thursday.

The Justice Department has repeatedly resisted requests to turn over information regarding the source, citing national security concerns.

FBI Director Chris Wray, speaking at a Senate Appropriations Committee hearing Wednesday, defended the agency’s approach to congressional oversight requests, amid the tension with House Republicans.

“As anybody in the intelligence community knows, human sources in particular who put themselves at great risk to work with us and with our foreign partners have to be able to trust that we're going to protect their identities and, in many cases, their lives and lives of their families,” he said. “The day that we can't protect human sources is the day the American people start becoming less safe.”

ABC's Devin Dwyer contributed to this report.

“I think we’re going to have to look into whether we can challenge the legitimacy of this entire investigation,” he said on Fox News. “Maybe the special counsel never should have been appointed.”

But on Friday morning, amid Trump's tweets, the former New York City mayor told CNN that the president didn't know "for sure" if there was a spy on his campaign.

“I don’t know for sure, nor does the president, if there really was one,” he said.

“They believed Chris's information might be credible because they had other intelligence that indicated the same thing and one of those pieces of intelligence was a human source from inside the Trump organization,” Simpson said.

"Disclosure of responsive information to such requests can risk severe consequences, including potential loss of human lives, damage to relationships with valued international partners, compromise of ongoing criminal investigations, and interference with intelligence activities," Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd said in the letter, which also claimed that the White House supported the Justice Department's decision to withhold the information.

“What we’re trying to do is get the documents to figure out, did they actually have, what methods were used to open this counterintelligence investigation,” Nunes said on “Fox and Friends” this week.

Meadows and Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, recently met with White House chief of staff John Kelly over concerns about the pace of DOJ disclosures to Congress.

“I can tell you that the president has been consistent about wanting greater transparency and so I don’t know that this would be at odds with what he’s been espousing for a number of months,” Meadows told ABC News on Thursday.

The Justice Department has repeatedly resisted requests to turn over information regarding the source, citing national security concerns.

FBI Director Chris Wray, speaking at a Senate Appropriations Committee hearing Wednesday, defended the agency’s approach to congressional oversight requests, amid the tension with House Republicans.

“As anybody in the intelligence community knows, human sources in particular who put themselves at great risk to work with us and with our foreign partners have to be able to trust that we're going to protect their identities and, in many cases, their lives and lives of their families,” he said. “The day that we can't protect human sources is the day the American people start becoming less safe.”

ABC's Devin Dwyer contributed to this report.

Top Stories

Top Stories

Top Stories

Top Stories

ABC News Live

ABC News Live

24/7 coverage of breaking news and live events