Meet Graham, Who Survives Car Crashes So Others Can Live

Graham is the lifelike interactive sculpture sent on a mission, over and over.

ByJENNIFER HANSLER
July 22, 2016, 3:13 PM
PHOTO: The Transport Accident Commission of Victoria, Australia unveiled 'Graham,' an interactive lifelike sculpture designed to survive crash impacts, July 21, 2016.
The Transport Accident Commission of Victoria, Australia unveiled 'Graham,' an interactive lifelike sculpture designed to survive crash impacts, July 21, 2016.
Victoria Transport Accident Commission

— -- What he lacks in looks, he makes up for in evolutionary prowess. Meet Graham, the "only person designed to survive" a car crash.

The Transport Accident Commission (TAC) of Victoria, Australia, spearheaded Graham's creation. An artist collaborated with a trauma surgeon and a crash investigation expert to create "an interactive lifelike sculpture ... designed with bodily features that might be present in humans if they had evolved to withstand the forces involved in crashes," according to a news release. Developed about a year ago, Graham is made of silicon but with real human hair. He took six months to build.

PHOTO: The Transport Accident Commission of Victoria, Australia unveiled 'Graham,' an interactive lifelike sculpture designed to survive crash impacts, July 21, 2016.
The Transport Accident Commission of Victoria, Australia unveiled 'Graham,' an interactive lifelike sculpture designed to survive crash impacts, July 21, 2016.
Victoria Transport Accident Commission

Among the features are an enlarged skull, a flat fatty face, and a rib cage replete with "sacks" to function like an airbag.

PHOTO: The Transport Accident Commission of Victoria, Australia unveiled 'Graham', an interactive lifelike sculpture designed to survive crash impacts, July 21, 2016.
The Transport Accident Commission of Victoria, Australia unveiled 'Graham', an interactive lifelike sculpture designed to survive crash impacts, July 21, 2016.
Victoria Transport Accident Commission

TAC officials hope Graham will help people understand the importance of designing safer roadways.

"Cars have evolved a lot faster than humans and Graham helps us understand why we need to improve every aspect of our roads system to protect ourselves from our own mistakes,” TAC chief executive Joe Calafiore said in a statement.

ABC News Live

ABC News Live

24/7 coverage of breaking news and live events