Frantic calls released from Parkland shooting: 'I love you, it's going to be fine ... I need you to play dead,' mom says

PHOTO: Medical personnel tend to a victim following a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 14, 2018.PlayJohn McCall/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP
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"I love you, it’s going to be fine," a panic-stricken mother said over the phone to her child hiding in a classroom during the Parkland, Florida, school massacre. "Can you play dead? I need you to play dead."

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Officials on Thursday released some of the frantic 911 calls made during the Feb. 14 mass shooting. Seventeen students and staff members were shot and killed in the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that sent shock waves across the nation.

The suspected school shooter, Nikolas Cruz, a former student, was arrested after the shooting. On Wednesday a grand jury indicted Cruz, charging him with 17 counts of premeditated murder in the first-degree and 17 counts of attempted murder in the first-degree.

PHOTO: Students and parents embrace after a mass shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 14, 2018.Saul Martinez/The New York Times via Redux
Students and parents embrace after a mass shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 14, 2018.

School officer Scot Peterson, who was criticized in the wake of the shooting for not going into the school, can be heard telling a dispatcher, "We don't have any description but it appears to be -- shot -- shots fired" as gunfire is heard in the background. A minute later he shouts, "Get the school on lockdown, gentlemen!"

Peterson is heard warning officers not to enter "12 or 1300 building" and six minutes after making the initial call gives a description of the suspect, saying, "10-4 all units be advised a male in a hoodie possible AR-15 or AK-47."

One man who was not at the school but was on the phone with a student inside told the 911 operator that two students were alone huddled in one classroom.

That man acted as the liaison between the hiding student and the dispatcher.

PHOTO: Students released from a lockdown are overcome with emotion following following a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 14, 2018.John McCall/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP
Students released from a lockdown are overcome with emotion following following a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 14, 2018.

PHOTO: People bow their heads while waiting for word from students at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooting on Feb. 14, 2018.Amy Beth Bennett/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images
People bow their heads while waiting for word from students at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooting on Feb. 14, 2018.

"Don’t talk, just be quiet," the man tells the student.

"Try hiding behind the curtain or something," he says, later asking if there's a cabinet or a closet in the room.

PHOTO: Students are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a mass shooting on Feb. 14, 2018.Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP
Students are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a mass shooting on Feb. 14, 2018.

The operators asks if there are teachers there and the man says just two students.

"She’s hearing yelling in the hallway," the man said.

"Tell her to be quiet," the operator said. "We don’t know -- there’s a lot going on, just tell her to be quiet."

PHOTO: Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School staff, teachers and students return to school greeted by police and well wishers in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 28, 2018.
SLIDESHOW: Heartbreaking photos from the Parkland school shooting

"Let her know she’s doing good, just keep try to keep her calm," the operator adds. "She’s doing good. All police, we got extra units from other places in other cities coming."

The man relays to the student, "Be calm, be quiet, help is on the way. Police from all over are coming."

PHOTO: First responders gather after a shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 14, 2018.WPLG
First responders gather after a shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 14, 2018.

"There’s no place to hide," the man tells the dispatcher. "They are crouched."

Next to the man was the student's mother, listening on speaker phone.

Later the man says, "Somebody just entered the room."

"OK, who is it that entered the room?!" the operator asks.

PHOTO: Alana Koer, of Parkland, Fla., shows the text messages she exchanged with her son during the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, during a vigil on Feb. 15, 2018.Brynn Anderson/AP
Alana Koer, of Parkland, Fla., shows the text messages she exchanged with her son during the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, during a vigil on Feb. 15, 2018.

The man asks into the phone, "Is it the police?!"

Then the mother listening over the phone says, "I love you! I love you! It’s mom."

The man tells the dispatcher, "It’s the police, they said put your hands up."

"I love you, I love you, it’s going to be fine," the mother says. "Can you hide from there? Can you play dead? Can you play dead? I need you to play dead."

Finally the man says the student told him the police arrived.

PHOTO: An officer talks to parents of students from Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooting on Feb. 14, 2018.Amy Beth Bennett/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images
An officer talks to parents of students from Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooting on Feb. 14, 2018.

"The police are there right now and they are checking the injured out," he tells the dispatcher. "The police are escorting the students out of the classroom."

"OK alright, sir," the operator says. "Thank you so very much, sir."

"Thank you for all your help," he replies. "I hope this turns out to be not as bad."

"Yes, I hope so too," the operator adds.

ABC News' Malka Abramoff, Katherine Carroll, Alexandra Faul, Rachel Katz and Brendan Rand contributed to this report.

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