Everything to know about today's National School Walkout

PHOTO: Students from Montgomery Blair High School march down Colesville Road in support of gun reform legislation Feb. 21, 2018 in Silver Spring, Maryland. PlayWin McNamee/Getty Images
WATCH Everything to know about the National School Walkout on March 14

Students, teachers, parents and administrators across the country have been invited to take part in a National School Walkout in a call on the U.S. government to pass stricter gun control laws.

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The ENOUGH National School Walkout will take place today, exactly one month after the Feb. 14 mass shooting at a Florida high school that killed 17 people.

PHOTO: Activists hold up signs at the Florida State Capitol as they rally for gun reform legislation, Feb. 26, 2018, in Tallahassee, Fla.Don Juan Moore/Getty Images
Activists hold up signs at the Florida State Capitol as they rally for gun reform legislation, Feb. 26, 2018, in Tallahassee, Fla.

The event will be at 10 a.m. across every time zone and last 17 minutes -- one minute for each of the victims gunned down in the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

PHOTO: Ariana Gonzalez is over come with emotion as she visits a cross setup for her friend, football coach Aaron Feis, at the memorial in front of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Feb. 23, 2018 in Parkland, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Ariana Gonzalez is over come with emotion as she visits a cross setup for her friend, football coach Aaron Feis, at the memorial in front of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Feb. 23, 2018 in Parkland, Florida.

The walkout is organized by young people working with Women’s March Youth Empower.

Women’s March Youth Coordinator Tabitha St. Bernard Jacobs, one of the few adults helping with the youth-led movement, told ABC News that while today's walkout is in reaction to the Parkland shooting, the event is about calling out gun violence.

PHOTO: Supporters hold signs as students head back to classes at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 28, 2018.Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP
Supporters hold signs as students head back to classes at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 28, 2018.

St. Bernard Jacobs said it is a way to call attention to the kind of gun violence that exists not just in schools, but everyday gun violence, like shootings that hurt communities of color or cities like Chicago.

PHOTO: Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School staff, teachers and students return to school greeted by police and well wishers in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 28, 2018.
SLIDESHOW: Heartbreaking photos from the Parkland school shooting

Students across the country have said they would join, as well as groups from schools as far as Ireland, Switzerland and Israel.

How participants spend the 17 minutes of the walkout is up to them. Some people are doing a lie-in, while others are holding rallies, St. Bernard Jacobs said.

This isn't a protest against schools but a way to encourage school administrators to help students "amplify their voices," she said.

She added, "Some schools are looking to this as an opportunity to really educate their young people about what it means in this moment to be engaged."

PHOTO: Students of area High Schools rally at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after participating in a county wide school walk out in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 21, 2018. Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images
Students of area High Schools rally at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after participating in a county wide school walk out in Parkland, Fla., Feb. 21, 2018.

Today's event is just one of many student walkouts erupting throughout the United States as a new generation of youth advocates lead a fierce push for tougher gun laws. While many school districts are supportive of the protests, some schools have reportedly threatened to punish students participating in walkouts.

PHOTO: Students from the Washington, D.C. area held a lie in protest outside the White House to honor victims of the Parkland shooting last week and call for reform of gun laws. Geneva Sands/ABC
Students from the Washington, D.C. area held a "lie in" protest outside the White House to honor victims of the Parkland shooting last week and call for reform of gun laws.

PHOTO: Demonstrators chant during a lie-in demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House, Feb.19, 2018, in Washington, D.C. Zach Gibson/Getty Images
Demonstrators chant during a "lie-in" demonstration supporting gun control reform near the White House, Feb.19, 2018, in Washington, D.C.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said schools can punish students for missing class for walkouts, but the punishment should only be because students are missing school; it cannot be a harsher punishment because the students participated in a protest.

PHOTO: Students participate in a protest against gun violence, Feb. 21, 2018 outside the White House in Washington, D.C.Alex Wong/Getty Images
Students participate in a protest against gun violence, Feb. 21, 2018 outside the White House in Washington, D.C.

Dozens of colleges and universities have said they won't penalize applicants who are peaceful student protesters. Brown University, for example, posted on Twitter, "Applicants to Brown: Expect a socially conscious, intellectually independent campus where freedom of expression is fundamentally important. You can be assured that peaceful, responsible protests against gun violence will not negatively impact decisions on admission to Brown."

For St. Bernard Jacobs, "That's very encouraging," she said. "This is a moment for youth to find their voice."

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