Small plane crashes near Dallas, killing all 10 people on board

PHOTO: Authorities responded to a deadly plane crash and subsequent fire in Addison, Texas, on Sunday, June 30, 2019.PlayTwitter via @Fire2Film
WATCH Small plane crash kills all 10 people on board

A small two-engine plane went down in a fiery crash on Sunday morning, killing all 10 people on board.

The aircraft had just taken off from the Addison Airport, north of Dallas, when it crashed into an unoccupied hangar at around 9 a.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The Beechcraft BE-350 King Air aircraft was destroyed by fire and there were no survivors.

The plane lifted into the air before it veered to the left and rolled over, the left wing hitting the hanger, according to witnesses. The flight was headed to St. Petersburg, Florida.

“It was really thick. You could tell there was some type of burning chemicals, gas or oil,” one witness told ABC affiliate WFAA, referring to the smoke from the crash. “It definitely looked black enough for it to be serious.”

The National Transportation Safety Board, which is investigating the crash, declined to disclose the names of victims, but said there were two flight crew members and eight passengers aboard at the time of the crash.

PHOTO: Authorities responded to a deadly plane crash and subsequent fire in Addison, Texas, on Sunday, June 30, 2019. Twitter via @Fire2Film
Authorities responded to a deadly plane crash and subsequent fire in Addison, Texas, on Sunday, June 30, 2019.

"The FAA will release the tail number after investigators verify it. Neither the FAA nor the NTSB release the names of aircraft occupants," the NTSB said in a statement. "We defer to local officials to make that information available at the appropriate time."

The crash, which took place in Addison, Texas, was the deadliest in the state since 1991, when a commuter plane crashed into a cornfield near Eagle Lake, Texas, killing all 14 people on board, according to the NTSB's aviation accident database.

ABC News' Darren Reynolds and Mina Kaji contributed to this report.