'Start Here': The future of work in the US and the traditional labor model

PHOTO: 2020 Democratic Presidential hopeful Andrew Yang speaks on-stage during the Democratic National Committees summer meeting in San Francisco, Calif., Aug. 23, 2019.PlayJosh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images
WATCH News headlines today: Sept. 16, 2019

It's Monday, Sept. 2, 2019. On this special Labor Day edition of "Start Here," the future of work might be shifting, but is the traditional labor model broken in the U.S.? Let's start here.

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1. Universal basic income

As big-name Democratic politicians have struggled to qualify for debates, tech entrepreneur and presidential contender Andrew Yang has developed a hardcore group of supporters who rally around his "Freedom Dividend," a proposal to give every U.S. adult $1,000 a month.

On today's "Start Here," Yang paints the future of the American worker and lays out how the U.S. would pay for his universal basic income plan.

"We have to broaden and expand our definitions of what labor is beyond the 9 to 5 because the fact is, the 9 to 5 is disappearing before our eyes," Yang tells "Start Here" today.

2. Volunteer lives on the line

Tens of millions of Americans spend time volunteering every year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Some of them are "weekend warriors" who dedicate their free time to helping out a local charity or organization, while others are responsible for their community's safety, even without a paycheck.

ABC News' Alex Stone, who went on patrol with volunteer law enforcement in Los Angeles, tells the podcast there's no way of knowing the difference between a reserve deputy or officer, and a full-time, paid officer.

"Some of those deputies, some of those police officers are volunteers who are showing up when you call 911," he says. "They are reserve deputies and officers, but there's not much reserve about them."

PHOTO: Los Angeles Police Department Headquarters in Los Angeles, Sept. 10, 2017.
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images, FILE
Los Angeles Police Department Headquarters in Los Angeles, Sept. 10, 2017.

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Elsewhere:

'Saddest and worst day': Hurricane Dorian is a massive Category 5 hurricane Monday morning with sustained winds of 185 mph as it continues to batter the Bahamas in the Atlantic Ocean.

'Lost control of the vehicle': Comedian Kevin Hart was injured in a car crash in Malibu Hills over the weekend when his driver lost control of their vehicle while transporting Hart and one person.

'This problem needs to address mental illness': Citizens in T-shirts reading "Permian Basin Strong" descended on a vigil in Odessa, Texas, one day after a man opened fire on residents while driving across multiple towns in western Texas.

'Call the U.S. Marshals Service or 9-1-1 immediately': Federal authorities have released new images of a pair of murder suspects who overpowered security guards and escaped from a prison transport van last week.

From our friends at FiveThirtyEight:

'Unwelcome news among candidates': The deadline to make the third Democratic primary debate has passed, and thanks to harder qualifying rules, just 10 candidates made the stage.

Doff your cap:

Police in Missouri are searching for a teenage boy who was seen by an officer performing an incredible act of kindness -- helping shield an elderly woman from the driving rain.

PHOTO: An officer snapped a photo of a young man getting out of his car to help shield a woman from the rain. Independence Police Department
An officer snapped a photo of a young man getting out of his car to help shield a woman from the rain.

"His mom had no idea what was happening, because she thought she had done something wrong since I was in uniform," the police officer said, describing the interaction. "I told his mom that she has done amazing with him and I hope and pray he goes places. She started tearing up, because I was a cop and took time out of my day to call him out on what I witnessed."