'Start Here': VA director nominee on the ropes amid misconduct allegations

PHOTO: Navy Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson, President Donald Trumps nominee to be Secretary of Veteran Affairs, walks on Capitol Hill following a meeting in the office of Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) in Washington, D.C., April 24, 2018.PlayMichael Reynolds/EPA/REX/Shutterstock
WATCH 'Start Here' podcast: Confirmation frustration

It's Wednesday, April 25, 2018. Here are some of the stories we're talking about on ABC News' new daily podcast, "Start Here."

1. The doctor is ... out?

From the moment President Donald Trump tweeted that he was nominating his military-issued doctor, Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson, to head the Department of Veterans Affairs, critics started raising concerns. Is this officer qualified to lead the huge bureaucracy charged with keeping the nation's veterans healthy?

Well, this week, Capitol Hill was rocked with tales of not just Jackson's inexperience but allegations of outright misconduct. And sources began telling ABC News that suddenly the nomination was in jeopardy.

ABC News Congressional Correspondent Mary Bruce tells us that Jackson stayed mostly silent in the face of questions, while ABC's Devin Dwyer says the president didn't exactly offer a vote of confidence.

2. "Thanks but no thanks"

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt has faced weeks of increased scrutiny over reports of lavish spending.

He heads to Capitol Hill tomorrow to respond to questions about the department's budget, but lawmakers will undoubtedly ask the embattled EPA chief about his spending habits and possible ethics violations as a growing number of Democrats and several Republicans have called for him to step down.

Ahead of the marathon day of congressional hearings, the White House had offered to help Pruitt prepare, but sources told ABC News he declined assistance and instead chose to work with his own aides. This comes after sources said he appeared in an interview on Fox News against the advice of White House media specialists.

ABC's John Santucci, who's been covering the allegations against Pruitt, tells us why he may be spurning the White House.

In this April 3, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks at a news conference at the EPA in Washington.Andrew Harni/AP, FILE
In this April 3, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks at a news conference at the EPA in Washington.

3. Classroom controversy in Colorado

It was teachers in West Virginia who lit the match -- now it's become a wildfire.

In several states now -- Oklahoma, Arizona and Kentucky -- we've seen teachers walk off the job, demanding higher pay and better benefits. And tomorrow, teachers are planning to walk off the job in Colorado.

It can be a tough cause to argue against: Everybody likes teachers, and most agree they're underpaid.

But every day teachers are marching is a day kids are out of class and a day that parents are trying to figure out what to do with them while they go to work.

So, some state legislators in Colorado have come up with a solution: a law that would make a teachers' strike illegal.

We talk to one of the authors of the bill.

4. Amazon Key's your car

Delivery people have been allowed access inside homes owned by people participating in the Amazon Key program since last year. Yesterday, Amazon took the delivery system a step further -- and into customers' cars.

ABC News' Rebecca Jarvis, who got a first look at the in-car delivery program before it went public, explains how it works.

PHOTO: A package from Amazon Prime is loaded for delivery in New York, May 9, 2017. Last year, the online retailer introduced a system for letting people delivering packages into customers homes. Now, its their cars.Mark Lennihan/AP, FILE
A package from Amazon Prime is loaded for delivery in New York, May 9, 2017. Last year, the online retailer introduced a system for letting people delivering packages into customer's homes. Now, it's their cars.

"Start Here" is a daily ABC News podcast hosted by Brad Mielke featuring original reporting on stories that are driving the national conversation. Listen for free at Apple Podcasts -- also available on TuneIn, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Play Music, iHeartRadio and the ABC News app.

Follow @StartHereABC on social for exclusive content, show updates and more: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram.

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