Florence forecast: Tracking the storm as it barrels through the South
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WATCH: ABC News senior meteorologist Rob Marciano tracks the path and the strength of the Category 1 storm as it slams the Carolina coast.

It started the week as a Category 4 hurricane and made landfall as a Category 1 storm, but Florence has now been downgraded to a tropical storm.

Florence pummeled North Carolina Friday, battering the state with torrential rain, life-threatening flooding and punishing winds. The storm could hover over parts of North and South Carolina for days, drenching the area with record rainfall.

Here's the latest forecast:

-- There have been eight storm-related fatalities in North Carolina so far.

-- The storm made landfall in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, shortly after 7 a.m. Friday, with 90 mph winds.

-- Wilmington, North Carolina, got whacked with a 105 mph wind gust Friday morning -- the first time since 1958.

-- Oriental, North Carolina, has seen over 20 inches of rain, and 23.04 inches of rain have fallen so far in Newport and Morehead City, about an inch shy of the all-time rain record of 24.06 inches in the state set by Hurricane Floyd in 1999.

-- Florence, with winds of 70 mph, is moving inland very slowly at just 3 mph Friday afternoon. The storm was about 25 miles northeast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, shortly before 5 p.m. The massive storm stretches 450 miles wide.

-- Major flash flooding is expected in the Carolinas through the weekend as heavy rain continues to dump water onto already hard-hit areas. Rain totals could climb to 40 inches in southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. A flash flood emergency remains in effect for several counties in North Carolina.

-- Seven to 15 more inches of rain will fall Friday along the North Carolina/South Carolina border.

This NOAA/RAMMB satellite image taken Sept. 14, 2018 at 8:00 am EST shows Hurricane Florence making landfall on US east coast.

-- On Saturday 7 to 10 inches of rain is expected closer to the inland North Carolina/South Carolina border.

Dianna Wood, embraces her husband, Lynn, while looking out over their flooded property as the Little River continues to rise in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Linden, North Carolina, Sept. 18, 2018. &qu... Photo Credit: David Goldman/AP
An official looks out a helicopter at homes surrounded by flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, Sept. 17, 2018, in Conway, S.C. Photo Credit: Sean Rayford/Getty Images
Two people sit on the roof of a vehicle trapped in floodwaters from Hurricane Florence, Sept. 17, 2018 in Wallace, S.C. Photo Credit: Sean Rayford/Getty Images
A cat clings to the side of a trailer in the flood waters before it was saved as the Northeast Cape Fear River overflowed its banks in the aftermath Hurricane Florence in Burgaw, N.C., Sept. 17, 2018. Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
Bob Richling carries Iris Darden as water from the Little River starts to seep into her home, Sept. 17, 2018 in Spring Lake, N.C. Photo Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Jimmy Shackleford transports his son Jim Shackleford and his wife Lisa, and their pets, in the bucket of his tractor as the Northeast Cape Fear River overflows its banks during flooding after Hurricane Florence... Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
Panicked dogs that were left caged by an owner who fled rising flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, are rescued by volunteer rescuer Ryan Nichols of Longview, Texas, in Leland, N.C., Sept. 16, 2... Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
Floodwaters from Hurricane Florence rush down Cool Spring Street, inundating the St. James Church in Fayetteville, N.C. on 16 Sept. 2018. The Cape Fear River Valley, like many other river systems in eastern Nor... Photo Credit: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/REX via Shutterstock
Members of the North Carolina Task Force urban search and rescue team check cars in a flooded neighborhood looking for residents who stayed behind as Florence continues to dump heavy rain in Fayetteville, N.C.,... Photo Credit: David Goldman/AP
Oliver Kelly, 1, cries as he is carried off the sheriff's airboat during his rescue from rising flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Leland, North Carolina, Sept. 16, 2018. Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
Michelle Tate speaks with Red Cross volunteer Jennifer McQuilken at the Red Cross shelter in the East Mecklenburg High School gymnasium, in Charlotte, N.C., Sept. 16, 2018. The Carolinas were drenched and large... Photo Credit: Alyssa Schukar/The New York Times/Redux
Hog farm buildings are inundated with floodwater from Hurricane Florence near Trenton, N.C., Sept. 16, 2018. Photo Credit: Steve Helber/AP
A boat lays smashed against a car garage, deposited there by the high winds and storm surge from Hurricane Florence along the Neuse River, Sept. 15, 2018, in New Bern, N.C. Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Waves crash over the road over washed by Hurricane Florence in Ocracoke, NC., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Steve Helber/AP
Joseph Eudi looks at flood debris and storm damage from Hurricane Florence at a home on East Front Street in New Bern, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Gray Whitley/Sun Journal via AP
A farm house is surrounded by flooded fields from tropical storm Florence in Hyde County, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Steve Helber/AP
A woman makes her way to her home that is surrounded by flood waters after Hurricane Florence passed through the area on Sept. 15, 2018, in Southport, N.C. Photo Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Boats are stacked up on each other in a marina as a result from Florence in New Bern, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Steve Helber/AP
The courtyard at Queen's Point condos is filled with residents' belongings after the storm surge from Hurricane Florence tore open the lower floors with a four-foot high storm surge on Sept. 15, 2018, in New Be... Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
A woman searches through belongings in her garage after a four-foot storm surge produced by Hurricane Florence ripped through the Queen's Point condos along the Nuese River in New Bern, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
A Lumberton firefighter holds on to two nursing home patients as a member of the Cajun Navy drives his truck during the evacuation of a nursing home due to rising flood waters in Lumberton, N.C., on Sept. 15, 2... Photo Credit: Alex Edelman/AFP/Getty Images
Two people in a canoe paddle through a street that was flooded by Hurricane Florence north of New Bern, N.C. on Sept. 15, 2018. Storm surge and heavy flooding from the hurricane has inundated much of Eastern No... Photo Credit: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/REX via Shutterstock
Members of NC Task Force 10, comprised of the New Bern and Greenville fire departments, search for residents in the Duffyfield neighborhood of New Bern, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Florence, the powerful storm that h... Photo Credit: Victor J. Blue/The New York Times/Redux
Storm damage caused by high winds is seen on Ocean Avenue as the outer bands of Hurricane Florence make landfall on Sept. 14, 2018, in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Photo Credit: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images
An abandoned car's hazard lights continue to flash as it sits submerged in rising flood waters during pre-dawn hours after Hurricane Florence struck in Wilmington, N.C., Sept. 15, 2018. Photo Credit: Jonathan Drake/Reuters
High winds and heavy rain limit visibility as a North Carolina National Guard truck crosses the bridge over the Neuse River during Hurricane Florence on Sept. 14, 2018, in New Bern, N.C. Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Robert Simmons Jr. and his kitten "Survivor" are rescued from floodwaters after Hurricane Florence dumped several inches of rain in the area overnight, Sept. 14, 2018 in New Bern, N.C. Photo Credit: Andrew Carter/The News & Observer via AP
People sit at a bar that has no power and drink during a "Hurricane Party" as Hurricane Florence comes ashore on Wilmington, North Carolina, Sept. 14, 2018. Photo Credit: Carlo Allegri/Reuters
From left, Nash Fralick, Michael Jenkins and Ethan Hall examine damage to Tidewater Brewing Co. in Wilmington, N.C., after Hurricane Florence made landfall, Sept. 14, 2018. Photo Credit: Chuck Burton/AP
Eric Edwards Jr., left, and Elliott Farmer Jr. look at their phones from a blow up mattress at a storm shelter at Washington Street United Methodist Church as Florence slowly moves across the East Coast Friday,... Photo Credit: Sean Rayford/AP
Debris from Hurricane Florence covers a street in downtown New Bern, N.C., Sept. 14, 2018. Photo Credit: Chris Seward/AP
Rescue workers from Township No. 7 Fire Department and volunteers from the Civilian Crisis Response Team help rescue a woman and her dog from their flooded home during Hurricane Florence, Sept. 14, 2018, in Jam... Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Volunteer Amber Hersel from the Civilian Crisis Response Team helps rescue 7-year-old Keiyana Cromartie and her family from their flooded home, Sept. 14, 2018, in James City, N.C. Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Waves slam the Oceana Pier & Pier House Restaurant in Atlantic Beach, N.C., Sept. 13, 2018 as Hurricane Florence approaches the area. Photo Credit: Travis Long/The News & Observer via AP
Hurricane Florence is seen through a super wide angle lens from the International Space Station, Sept. 12, 2018. Photo Credit: ESA/NASA

-- As Florence makes its way inland, Charlotte, Columbia and Fayetteville could all see extreme flooding.

-- On Sunday, 4 to 8 inches of rain is expected in the Appalachians of North Carolina and southern Virginia.

-- Storm surge is also a major concern, potentially reaching 11 feet in parts of North Carolina. The storm surge threat is greatest between Cape Fear and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. "People do not live and survive to tell the tale about what their experience is like with storm surge," FEMA administrator Brock Long told "Good Morning America."

Waves slam the Oceana Pier & Pier House Restaurant in Atlantic Beach, N.C., Sept. 13, 2018 as Hurricane Florence approaches the area.