We asked Marie Kondo to fold a bag of potato chips and other random stuff

There’s nothing more satisfying than watching Marie Kondo fold things.

February 15, 2019, 4:36 AM

I think we can all agree on one thing -- there's nothing more satisfying than watching Marie Kondo fold things.

Kondo is widely known for her bestselling book, "The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing," and more recently her Netflix show, "Tidying Up with Marie Kondo," where she teaches American families the art of decluttering.

PHOTO: We challenged Kondo with this home-knit twisted infinity scarf.
We challenged Kondo with this home-knit twisted infinity scarf.
ABC

If you haven't heard, her organizational process centers on one question: "Does the item spark joy?"

If the answer is no, then it should be donated or given to a friend, according to Kondo.

Her decluttering technique follows six rules of tidying -- you can learn about them all here.

PHOTO: A KonMari perfect fold of a collared shirt.
A KonMari perfect fold of a collared shirt.
ABC

But perhaps her most famous organizing hack is the KonMari folding method -- folding clothes in halfs or thirds so you end up with a rectangle that stands up by itself. The clothes can then be placed in drawers or on shelves upright so you can easily see what you have.

So when Kondo visited us at "GMA," we knew we had to see her folding skills in action. We brought some odds and ends from our closets and put them in front of her to see the master in action.

Here's what we brought:

Thick wool socks

A collared shirt

A blanket

A bag of potato chips

Yoga mat

Stiff jean jacket

An infinity scarf

A bunch of handbags

PHOTO: While rolling a yoga mat Kondo says you should express gratitude for the practice
While rolling a yoga mat Kondo says you should express gratitude for the practice.
ABC

Kondo smiled bright as we handed her the rather odd array of items.

With some effort she was able to wrangle all of the items into that perfect KonMari rectangle, minus one leather purse. Which, probably shouldn’t ever be folded anyway.

Perhaps what is most impressive about Kondo, after getting to be in the same room as her, is not her folding methods, but rather her charisma. To many of her fans, she transcends language and has a unique spark that lights up the room.

And though her life-changing message is at odds with American consumerism, it is in line with a philosophy to live a better life. Appreciate what you have, find happiness in small things, and get rid of what no longer sparks joy for you.

I, for one, will not get rid of anything Marie Kondo folded for me.

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