'Selfie' Short Film Makes Big Waves at Sundance Film Festival

The movie features mothers and daughters revealing how they really feel about the way they look.
3:00 | 01/21/14

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Transcript for 'Selfie' Short Film Makes Big Waves at Sundance Film Festival
Now to a short movie making big headline. "Selfie" premiered at the sundance film festival with real mothers and teen daughters revealing about how they feel about their looks. Part of dove's real beauty campaign and bianna golodryga has the story. Reporter: It's a craze that has taken over America. The selfie. With young women in particular trying to capture that picture perfect pose and inevitably sharing it on social media. Now dove is delving deeper in a seven-minute documentary titled "Sell if I" that debuted Monday. They bring moms and daughters together to see firsthand how insecurity often lies beneath those beautiful snapshots. The thing that I hide when I take my picture is how big my hair looks. Sometimes in the mirror I like cover one of my arms like part of it to make it look like more narrow or something. I would never guess you did that in the mirror. Reporter: Encouraging the moms to address their vulnerabilities. I don't like age or wriefkles. Gee, I want my mom to know she's beautiful and she doesn't have to change for anyone. Mom blogger Tracy Clark felt it was important to watch with her 16-year-old daughter Julia. I want my girls to know every phase of their lives they are beautiful for who they are and it's important for me to internalize that for myself. Basically when a girl thinks about herself kind of comes from how her mom feels about herself. Dove which launched real beauty campaigns in the past says it hopes selfie causes a positive conversation between mothers and daughters and will empower women everywhere to see beyond their flaws. If giving my young girls the power of their own self if I and what they think and celebrating their differences. Reporter: And for the girls in the film, this he say it worked. They displayed their selfies at a photo exhibit for everyone to critique. Accept you're insecure, they'll look at things differently and that made them beautiful. They're not blond or super tall or skinny but that doesn't mean I'm not beautiful. I'm pretty cute. Reporter: For "Good morning America," bianna golodryga, ABC news, New York. Some of those -- all of those pictures. Yeah. Adorable. We want to know what you had to say. Our "Gma" flash poll. We asked do you think selfies are helping or hurting our kids' self-esteem? Well, 56% say you're hurting. Wow. Kids' self-esteem so brought in Dr. Logan levkoff author of "Got tines." It'll go on soon on February 11th. What is it about selfies? Selfies represent the first time the young person has the power to control their self-image and how the world sees them. Which, you know, the truth is I can't understand because the only time I got a chance to express myself was what I wore to school or for some I was quoted or seen in the school newspaper. It's a very powerful moment for them but we can't really understand. When you pose something you sub yourself to comment and sometimes anonymous comments and that's what I'm worried with for my daughters. All those things unhealthy asking for commentary and anonymity allows people to be really unfaceful at times. I was impressed to see so many moms getting into the ago. What is Mr. For them. The film happens to be beautiful and does tell us that mothers often unload our own baggage on to our children and maybe teach them things about themselves that they shouldn't be learning. We shouldn't be critiquing our daughters and this is not just for mothers, it's certainly for dads too but we do often unload on to our children. Put that same kind of label on themselves. They're watching, respect they? They're watching and listening to us so every time we comment something negative about ourselves, they're wondering the same thing about them. Logan, what advice do you have? Everybody seems to have a device and kids are loving posting these things. What do you say to moms? I think we need to watch how much we're posting but also I want people to post selfies in the moment of them achieving something, in the moment of something proud, something that has to do with their character, not just about what they look like. That's a great piece of advice. Thanks. That's so pow you careful. Ellie got her first phone, she's 11, a few weeks ago. First thing they want to do is put those photos up from any moment of the day. I think you're on to it. A sense of Independence. It's the first time because, you're right, expressing yourself because you said, that's right. Back in the day it's how you dressed for school, very limited and how they're using it. Make sure that people remember intimate moments should still be intimate. Amen to that. Take them but you don't have to post them. Exactly. We settled that. All right. Moving on we have more to

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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