FDA Panel Digests Data Linking Food Coloring, Hyperactivity

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"Food colors add to our enjoyment of foods by maintaining or improving their appearance," said IFIC President and CEO David Schmidt, in a prepared statement. "Without sufficient scientific evidence that a causal link truly exists between food colors and hyperactivity in children, communications that suggest a link could have unintended consequences, including unnecessarily frightening consumers about safe ingredients that are consumed every day."

On Thursday, the panel will hear from the International Association of Color Manufacturers, a color additive trade group.

The panel will then vote what, if any, action the FDA should take on food coloring.

The debate over food coloring began in the 1970s with Dr. Benjamin Feingold and the popularization of the Feingold diet that promotes eliminating food additives such as dyes and preservatives as a way to treat hyperactive children. The diet is controversial among many in the mainstream medical community.

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