'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel': What to expect in season 2

PHOTO: Rachel Brosnahan as Midge Maisel in the first season of Amazons "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel," 2017.PlayNicole Rivelli/Amazon Prime
WATCH 'Marvelous Mrs. Maisel' season 2: What to expect

"The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" returns Wednesday for season 2, and fans of the critically acclaimed Amazon comedy have been wondering for months what to expect.

Rachel Brosnahan, who won a best actress Emmy in September for her starring role as aspiring comedian Miriam "Midge" Maisel, told "Good Morning America" that the second installment of the series will have the same heart that made fans fall in love with season 1.

Whether viewers identify with Midge, a headstrong 1950s housewife who, after being left by her husband, finds solace in stand-up comedy, or one of the other characters in the show, Brosnahan attributes the show's success to the fact that "there's something in there for everybody."

"Midge is a character who leads with joy, and I think that's something we need a lot more of in the world right now," Brosnahan said. "But also, a lot of the battles that women were facing, they're still facing today even though they might look a little bit different. I think a lot of the expectations placed on women, and some of the double standards between men and women, certainly still exist."

Though Brosnahan's lips were zipped about specific plot points, the actress, who spoke with "GMA" as part of her partnership with the American Express Cash Magnet Card, a product that gives cash back on all purchases, did give an idea of what season two would entail.

1. The seasons have changed: One could argue that the costumes in "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" are characters unto themselves, and that will continue, Brosnahan said. "In season 2 we go into the summer, which is a season that we haven't seen yet on the show," she said. "There are plenty of beautiful summer dresses and hats and different kinds of gloves, and sunglasses. Oh my God, the sunglasses are to die for."

2. Reality has begun to set in: As a New York City housewife, Brosnahan's character has always lived a very comfortable life and she finds herself to be a fish out of water in the comedy community. "Midge is actively pursuing this dream of being a comedian, but it's not all sunshine and roses," Brosnahan revealed. "The comedy world is tough. It's gritty, it's a little rough and tumble, which is something she's not used to. She comes from a very privileged background, and that's something she's confronted with in a big way."

3. Her new career is still a big secret: At the end of season 1, Midge's estranged husband, Joel, discovers that she's been performing stand-up comedy in downtown Manhattan, though many of the other characters in the show remain in the dark. "Midge [is] sitting on this giant, explosive secret," Brosnahan teased, "and I think trying to keep all those plates spinning and make sure that nobody finds out what she's up to is a huge challenge." How does she do that? "I can't say much more than that yet!" Brosnahan demurred.

4. Midge may have a new love interest: Zachary Levi has joined the cast, though Brosnahan remained mum about his role. (Reviews seem to indicate that his character, whom she meets at a resort in the Catskills, could be a new beau for Midge.) "Jane Lynch comes back for an appearance, which I'm really excited about, and we have a couple brand new characters that I can't wait for you guys to meet!" Brosnahan added.

5. Some things about the show remain eternal: "A lesson that I'm encouraged that so many people seem to have taken from the show in general, and something that I hope continues through season 2, is that it's never too late to reinvent yourself -- it's never too late to find your voice or find a new passion or path that you'd like to pursue," Brosnahan said. "Midge will be faced a little bit more with the reality of what that groundbreaking change looks like but she doesn't know how to do anything less than 150 percent and I hope that viewers walk away feeling like they can do the things that they might be afraid to try, too."

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