Kevin M. Gill/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
  • Launched in August 2011, NASA’s Juno spacecraft entered Jupiter’s orbit on July 4, 2016, and has been providing photographs and findings that challenge previous assumptions about the planet. <br><br> Dramatic atmospheric features in Jupiter's northern hemisphere are captured in this view from NASA's Juno spacecraft on Feb. 12, 2019. The new perspective shows swirling clouds that surround a circular feature within a jet stream region called "Jet N6."
    Kevin M. Gill/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
  • This image of Jupiter's turbulent southern hemisphere was captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft as it performed its most recent close flyby of the gas giant planet on Dec. 21, 2018.
    Gerald Eichstadt/Sean Doran/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
  • A giant, spiraling storm in Jupiter's southern hemisphere is captured from NASA's Juno spacecraft on Dec. 21, 2019. The storm is approximately 5,000 miles across.
    Gerald Eichstadt/Sean Doran/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
  • Jupiter's southern hemisphere is seen in beautiful detail taken by NASA's Juno spacecraft. The color-enhanced view captures one of the white ovals in the "String of Pearls," one of eight massive rotating storms at 40 degrees south latitude on the giant gas planet. The image was taken on Oct. 24, 2017, as Juno performed its ninth close flyby of Jupiter.
    NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
  • This image taken by the JunoCam imager shows Jupiter's Great Red Spot as the Juno spacecraft performed its 7th close flyby of Jupiter, July 10, 2017. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 6,130 miles from the tops of the clouds of the planet.
    NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt
  • Juno's imager, JunoCam, has captured images revealing swirling storms at both poles, densely clustered and touching together. <br> This montage of 10 JunoCam images captures Jupiter growing and shrinking in apparent size before and after NASA's spacecraft made its closest approach, Aug. 27, 2016.
    NASA
  • Multiple atmospheric conditions appear to collide on Jupiter, March 27, 2017, in an image captured when the spacecraft was 7,900 miles from the planet.
    NASA
  • At a distance of about 12,400 miles from the planet, JunoCam spotted a swirling storm just south of one of the white oval storms on the planet, March 27, 2017.
    NASA
  • Oval storms dot the cloudscape in this enhanced color view of Jupiter's south pole, Dec. 11, 2016.
    NASA
  • This infrared image gives an unprecedented view of the southern aurora of Jupiter, Aug. 27, 2016. <br> <br> This view can hardly be seen from Earth due to our planet's position in respect to Jupiter's south pole. Juno's unique polar orbit provides the first opportunity to observe this region of the gas-giant planet in detail.
    NASA
  • This enhanced-color image of a mysterious dark spot on Jupiter, captured at an altitude of 9,000 miles above the planet's cloud tops, seems to reveal a Jovian galaxy of swirling storms, Feb. 2, 2017.
    NASA
  • This image highlights a massive counter-clockwise rotating storm that appears as a white oval in the gas giant's southern hemisphere, Feb, 2, 2017.
    NASA
  • From this view directly over Jupiter's south pole, the terminator (where day meets night) is visible; cutting across the Jovian south polar region's restless, marbled atmosphere, with the south pole itself approximately in the center of that border, Feb. 2, 2017.
    NASA
  • A close-up view of Jupiter, with resolution better than any previous pictures from Earth or other spacecrafts, captures the turbulent region just west of the Great Red Spot in the South Equatorial Belt, Dec. 11, 2016.
    NASA