American college student who died in Mexico was electrocuted on train tracks: Authorities

PHOTO: Amherst College student Andrew Dorogi died while in Mexico.PlayAmherst College/Twitter
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An American college student who died in Mexico was electrocuted when he fell onto train tracks, Mexican authorities said Friday.

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Andrew Dorogi, 21, a senior at Amherst College, was found dead in Mexico City on March 15, authorities said. His body was found at the Camarones Metro train station on the city's Line 7, according to the Mexico City Attorney General's Office.

Shortly before 11 p.m. on March 15, an auxiliary police officer of the Secretary Public Security was called to the tracks of the station to investigate a person in an unauthorized area. That's when the officer noticed a man lying on the tracks, authorities said.

After cutting the power, emergency services were called to the station to treat the man. Staff from the Red Cross, however, determined that the person was already dead, authorities said.

The body, identified by authorities as Dorogi, was claimed by his mother, according to the Mexico City AG's office.

After an autopsy, Dorogi died of electrocution, according to the Mexico City AG's office.

The investigation is still active, authorities told ABC News.

In a statement Monday, Carolyn Martin, president of Amherst College, notified students, faculty and staff of Dorogi's death.

"The cause of Andrew's death is still unknown and under investigation," the statement said.

"We know from his family that he did not die of suicide," the statement, citing Dorogi's family, continued.

Dorogi's family declined to be interviewed.

Dorogi was a member of the football team and studied economics, according to the university.

"Andrew was loved for his friendliness, joyfulness, sense of fun, and inclusiveness," the statement added, "and we will create an opportunity on campus to come together in his memory."

ABC News’ Anne Laurent and Conor Finnegan contributed to this report.

A previous version of this story indicated that the autopsy ruled the death a "culpable homicide," according to the Mexican authorities. The updated version, citing the latest information from the Mexico City AG's office, correctly states the cause of death as electrocution.

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