Florida man who pleaded guilty to mailing 16 package bombs tells judge the devices were 'not ever meant to work'

PHOTO: Cesar Sayoc is pictured in a booking photo dated Aug. 30, 2015.PlayBroward County Sheriff's Office via AP
WATCH Man held in suspected mail-bomb case to be transferred to New York

Cesar Sayoc, the Florida man who pleaded guilty to mailing 16 package bombs to critics of President Trump, is due back in federal court in Manhattan Monday after he claimed certain things he said at his plea hearing were inaccurate.

Interested in Mail Bomb Investigation?

Add Mail Bomb Investigation as an interest to stay up to date on the latest Mail Bomb Investigation news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

In a handwritten letter to Judge Jed Rakoff, Sayoc said “extreme emotional circumstances” influenced his answer when asked whether he knew his devices could harm.

During the March hearing Sayoc said he made devices “designed to look like pipe bombs” and “with the intent to injure” but his letter to the court said "the intention was only to intimidate and scare."

He called what he sent to former President Obama, Hillary Clinton, Robert De Niro and others "hoax, decoy devices" that were “not ever meant to work.”

From South Florida Sayoc sent letters to George Soros, Hillary Clinton, John Brennan, Robert De Niro, James Clapper, Barack Obama, Rep. Maxine Waters, Eric Holder, Joe Biden, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Kamala Harris, Thomas Steyer and CNN.

PHOTO: Police stand guard in a closed street after a bomb alert at the Time Warner offices in New York, Oct. 24, 2018. Justin Lane/EPA via Shutterstock, FILE
Police stand guard in a closed street after a bomb alert at the Time Warner offices in New York, Oct. 24, 2018.

None of the recipients were hurt but the packages could get Sayoc a life sentence when he is sentenced in September.

“I was not in right state of mind,” Sayoc said in a second letter to the judge. “I was overwhelmed, high anxiety, very nervous condition” when he answered affirmatively about knowing the risks posed by his actions.

PHOTO: Cesar Sayoc, 57, is shown in this courtroom sketch as he enters his plea in Manhattan federal court, on charges in connection with the mailing of bombs to prominent Democrats and other critics of President Trump, in New York, March 21, 2019. Jane Rosenberg/Reuters
Cesar Sayoc, 57, is shown in this courtroom sketch as he enters his plea in Manhattan federal court, on charges in connection with the mailing of bombs to prominent Democrats and other critics of President Trump, in New York, March 21, 2019.

“The devices would never explode or worked,” Sayoc said. “The fireworks was a sparkler and not capable to explode.”

It wasn’t immediately clear how Judge Rakoff would handle Sayoc’s assertions but ordered the parties into court, writing that he found it “necessary to hold an in person hearing to address these issues.”