'Start Here': 2020 policy discussions, tracking shooting threats in the US, a different trade war

PHOTO: Democratic presidential candidate and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee speaks during a forum on gun safety at the Iowa Events Center on August 10, 2019 in Des Moines, Iowa.PlayStephen Maturen/Getty Images
WATCH FiveThirtyEight writer talks possible recession and the 2020 presidential race

It's Friday, Aug. 23, 2019. Let's start here.

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1. Climate changed

Nate Silver, editor-in-chief of FiveThirtyEight, joins the podcast to discuss the failed presidential candidacy of Washington Gov. Jay Inslee.

Inslee's climate-focused campaign, Silver says, shows that "policy is not as important deep down to Democrats as they might kind of tell you on the surface."

2. 'Unmistakable'

Authorities have been extra vigilant in rooting out potential shooters after the recent massacres in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, ABC News' Alex Mallin tells us on "Start Here."

"It's definitely unmistakable that we are seeing an uptick in how serious they are taking these cases," Mallin adds.

3. That other trade war

Even if the U.S., as President Donald Trump has pledged, wins its trade war with China, China still may benefit significantly from the trade war brewing between Japan and South Korea.

Because of U.S. ties to both Japan and South Korea, retired Marine Col. and ABC News contributor Stephen Ganyard tells us: "China looks at this with glee."

4. Look what you made me do

Taylor Swift wants to re-record her earliest songs after losing the rights to them, and ABC News' Andrea Dresdale is here with the very latest.

"She doesn't like the fact that this guy that she accuses of trying to dismantle her legacy now owns the master recordings of her songs," Dresdale says.

PHOTO: NEW YORK, NEW YORK - AUGUST 22: Taylor Swift performs on ABCs Good Morning America at SummerStage at Rumsey Playfield, Central Park on August 22, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for ABA) Kevin Mazur/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - AUGUST 22: Taylor Swift performs on ABC's "Good Morning America" at SummerStage at Rumsey Playfield, Central Park on August 22, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for ABA)

"Start Here," ABC News' flagship podcast, offers a straightforward look at the day's top stories in 20 minutes. Listen for free every weekday on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn or the ABC News app. Follow @StartHereABC on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for exclusive content and show updates.

Elsewhere:

'You can see him bleeding': A teen in California is suing after bodycam footage shows an officer punching him.

'Rendered inoperative': An elevator in a New York City building known for having shoddy elevators malfunctions and crushes a man.

'Related to better heart health': Dogs: Still the best.

From our friends at FiveThirtyEight:

For decades, relievers pitched better than starters. Not anymore.: As recently as 2012, the overall ERA of relievers was half a run better than that of starting pitchers.

Doff your cap:

Demi Burnett dropped a "Bachelor in Paradise" bombshell that sent Bachelor Nation into a frenzy, and now she's opening up for the first time after coming out as bisexual.

Burnett sat down with ABC News and says "it means a lot" being able to come out on the show -- her same-sex relationship is a "Bachelor" first.

"I was just being myself and living my life and loving who I loved," she adds. "I just wanted to be honest with who I was and follow wherever my heart led me."

VIDEO: Demi Burnett opens up about 1st same-sex relationship in Bachelor history Play
Demi Burnett opens up about 1st same-sex relationship in 'Bachelor' history

She said the response from viewers and fans has been mixed.

"Being criticized does hurt," she tells us. "But I know that there's nothing that I can do to change how people are perceiving it or how they feel about it."