Ill. Man Repays Settlement with 4 Tons of Quarters

Aug 2, 2013 1:33pm

An Illinois man, frustrated by a court ruling that ordered him to return more than $500,000 he received following a car crash that killed his teenage son, sent the money back in quarters, totaling more than four tons in change.

Roger Herrin wanted to pay the money back in pennies, in protest of decision he thought was unfair, but when that proved impossible he settled for quarters, packaged in 50 pound sacks.

ap insurance quarters payment kb 130802 16x9 608 Ill. Man Repays Settlement with 4 Tons of Quarters

Credit: Paul Newton/The Southern/AP Photo

On Wednesday, an armored truck delivered $150,000 in change from the Federal Reserve in St. Louis, Mo., to two law firms representing three other victims who were also injured in the 2001 wreck.

Calling it “an obvious protest,” Herrin told ABC affiliate WSIL, “They can have all the money in the world and I’d take my son back.”

Michael Herrin, 15, was killed in 2001 when a truck ran a stop sign and broadsided the Jeep Cherokee in which the teen and his friends were riding.

ap insurance payment quarters kb 130802 16x9 608 Ill. Man Repays Settlement with 4 Tons of Quarters

Credit: Paul Newton/The Southern/AP Photo 

Roger Herrin received $1.6 million in compensation through his own insurance, plus an additional $800,000 paid out through other insurance.

Since Michael was the only one killed in the crash his estate received the bulk of the cash. The three injured survivors appealed and recently won, leading Herrin to begrudgingly return the money.

Citing confidentiality agreements, Mark Prince, an attorney for the Jeep’s driver and her son, who was also a passenger, would not discuss the case but called the delivery of coins “counterproductive.”

ap insurance quarters harrin kb 130802 16x9 608 Ill. Man Repays Settlement with 4 Tons of Quarters

Credit: Paul Newton/The Southern/AP Photo

“We’ve been on pins and needles because we had a lot of cash suddenly laying around, it was publicized,” Prince told the Associated Press. “We don’t have safes or vaults, and we lock our front door. Advance notice would have been nice, because we could have made arrangements to have it delivered to the bank.”

 

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