Google May Stick a Patent on Your Neck

By Sunaina Rajani @SunainaRaj

Nov 13, 2013 6:17am
HT google electronic tattoo nt 131112 16x9 608 Google May Stick a Patent on Your Neck

Google's Electronic Skin Tattoo Patent (USPTO)

What if your cellphone’s microphone was tattooed on your neck? Better yet, what if it was a lie detector as well?

Reducing the mechanical relationship between humans and technology has been a prevalent theme among players in the high-tech industry.

Google’s Motorola Mobility filed a patent for an electronic skin tattoo, or sticker. Essentially, this patent describes a noise-canceling, hand-free microphone for your cellphone that sticks on your throat.

The patented tattoo reduces acoustic noise, and connects to a communication device, wirelessly. This claimed invention could improve communication, especially in loud areas or in emergency situations.

But there is more. This electronic skin tattoo can carry a lie detector. The patent states that this temporary tattoo could “include a galvanic skin response detector.” If the user is “speaking falsehoods,” the tattoo can detect skin response caused by nervousness.

A spokesperson for Google’s Motorola Mobility declined to comment about the patent.

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Earlier this year, Regina Dugan, senior VP at Google’s Motorola Mobility, mentioned some of its project goals. She said their division was working on attaching a password authentication to the skin.

According to the patent, this claimed invention’s system will have an embedded microphone, technology that enables wireless communication with mobile devices and a power supply.

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What does Google have in store for their next product? A complete hand-free phone? And a lie detector?

 

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