Nov. 18: ‘Steamboat Willie’ Premieres 1928; ‘Aggie Bonfire’ Collapse 1999

Nov 18, 2011 4:33pm

1928 “Steamboat Willie” Cartoon Premieres

agb steamboat willie dm 111118 wblog Nov. 18: Steamboat Willie Premieres 1928; Aggie Bonfire Collapse 1999

Walt Disney's animated cartoon "Steamboat Willie" debuted, Nov. 18, 1928, in New York City. The cartoon starred Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse. (AP)

Walt Disney’s animated cartoon “Steamboat Willie” debuted at the Colony Theater on Broadway in New York City.  This cartoon was among the first animations to feature synchronized sound, and was also the first public appearance of Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse.  “Steamboat Willie” runs around 8 minutes,  and the estimated budget was a little less than $5,000.

 

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 1988 President Reagan’s War on Drugs

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1999 Bonfire Collapses at Texas A&M

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Famous Birthdays

1923 Alan Shepard

1923 Ted Stevens

1939 Margaret Atwood

1953 Alan Moore

1958 Oscar Nunez

1968 Gary Sheffield

1968 Owen Wilson

1969 Duncan Sheik

1974 Chloe Sevigny

1975 David Ortiz

1985 Christian Siriano

 

Jump back to Nov. 17: Day in History.

View more videos from This Month in History: November.

 

 

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