100 Arrested at Occupy Boston Protest; 1 Arrest in Chicago

Oct 11, 2011 6:46am

Approximately 100 demonstrators gathered as part of the Occupy Boston protest were arrested early Tuesday when they moved into an area outside of the designated space, according to Boston police.

Police said that the protested moved from an area of Dewey Square to another section of the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway near Pearl Street near downtown Boston. Officers say they repeatedly warned the protesters they would be arrested if they moved to the new section of the Greenway because they did not have permission to be there.

The protesters will likely be charged with trespassing, according to Boston Police, who added that for safety reasons they could not say how many officers were at the scene.

Since beginning the “Occupy Boston protests have not led to the violence or mass arrests similar to what was seen in New York last week, with police swinging batons and acting aggressively toward the protesters.

Still, the Occupy Boston organization insists police are being violent and dragging protesters away.

“Eye witness reports have come in stating that police dealt violently with members of Veterans for Peace who had come to support Occupy Boston. Other reports are still coming in regarding other instances of police brutality, but remain unconfirmed,” a posting on the group’s website said.

The Occupy Wall St. movement is now officially in its fifth week, and protests have spread  to 150 U.S. cities and into parts of Europe. The Occupy Boston group began loosely organizing in late September and has scheduled several demonstrations and protests, and has planned assembly meetings every day throughout October.

There was one arrest made related to the Occupy Chicago protests on Monday for battery to a police officer. And there were 24 administrative notices, or violations issued for pedestrians to exercise due care in a roadway, according to Chicago police officer Daryl Baety.

ABC News’ Whitney Lloyd and Susanna Kim contributed to this report.

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