Rick Perry Mixes Up Dates of American Revolution

Oct 12, 2011 12:35am
ap Rick Perry New Hampshire jt 111001 wblog Rick Perry Mixes Up Dates of American Revolution

Charles Krupa/AP Photo

Texas Governor Rick Perry energetically bounded into the Beta Theta Pi fraternity on Dartmouth College’s campus after Tuesday night’s debate, but when he was asked a question about states’ rights, he slipped up on the dates for when the American Revolution was fought.

“Our Founding Fathers never meant for Washington, D.C. to be the fount of all wisdom. As a matter of fact they were very much afraid if that because they’d just had this experience with this far-away government that had centralized thought process and planning and what have you, and then it was actually the reason that we fought the revolution in the 16th century was to get away from that kind of onerous crown if you will,” Perry said.”

But Perry’s version of American history doesn’t match the history books, which show the American Revolution was fought in the 18th century.

KTRK’s Ted Oberg caught up with Perry outside the debate watch party, and Perry admitted debates aren’t his strong suit.

“I just try to get up every day and do my job and you know debates are not my strong suit but you know, we get up and do them and we just try to let people see our passion and I think that’s what we did tonight,” he said.

Perry added that his energy policy roll out on Friday, which he touted in the debate, will be a focal point of his campaign.

“I think it’s probably going to be a key to the campaign because that’s what people really care about is getting American working again,” Perry said. “We’re going to lay out a way to get 1.2 million Americans working.”

When asked how his back’s doing, Perry responded that “it’s great” and bragged he’s been running for three weeks.

“I just can’t run as fast as I did, but I’ll be back.”

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