Cyndi Lauper Upset ‘True Colors’ Was Used in Romney Attack Ad

Jan 17, 2012 2:52pm

gty lauper romney tk 120117 wblog Cyndi Lauper Upset True Colors Was Used in Romney Attack Ad

 

Someone just wanted to have fun in using one of Cyndi Lauper’s hits for a negative Mitt Romney ad, but the ’80′s pop star was not amused.

Lauper took to Twitter last week after discovering that her 1986 hit “True Colors” was being used in a negative ad against the former Massachusetts governor called, what else, “True Color.” The singer tweeted that she found out after getting a phone call.

“Ol, just got back from the wk sp for KInky Boots. Got a phone call saying my version of True Colors was used in commercial trashing Romney,” Lauper wrote.

The singer, more widely known for her 1983 chart-topper “Girls Just Want to Have Fun,” went on to say that while she doesn’t support the GOP front runner, she never approved the use of “True Colors” in the negative ad. It was not clear who posted the ad.

“I wouldn’t have wanted that song to be used in that way,” Lauper tweeted. “Mr. Romney can discredit himself without the use of my work.”

“True Colors,” a song about acceptance, has been an anthem for the LGBT equality movement, and Lauper has said publicly she is a huge supporter of President Obama and his re-election bid.

Mitch Stewart, the Battleground States Director for Obama for America, responded on Twitter in kind, writing “Cyndi Lauper has never spoken truer words.”

The song has since been removed from the ad, which was also taken down from YouTube.

It’s a story that has been told many times — politicians getting smacked down for using artist’s songs without permission. Most recently, Tom Petty went after Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., in the early stages of her campaign for using his “American Girl” at rallies without his consent. And there have been many others, as ABC News’ John Berman pointed out:

SHOWS:
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus