U.S. Launches Airstrikes to Help Retake Mosul Dam

Aug 16, 2014 2:46pm

WASHINGTON — The United States has launched airstrikes around the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq in support of a ground operation by Kurdish and Iraqi forces to retake the strategic dam which was seized by ISIS fighters earlier this month.

The strikes could continue as those forces continue their effort to retake the dam.

The status of the dam has been a concern for Iraq and the United States because a breach could release a torrent of water that could flood Mosul and possibly reach as far down as Baghdad.

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U.S. Central Command said in a statement late today that a mix of fighter aircraft and Predator drones had conducted nine airstrikes near the Mosul Dam and Erbil. Centcom said the strikes had so far “destroyed or damaged four armored personnel carriers, seven armed vehicles, two Humvees and an armored vehicle.”

The statement said the strikes were conducted “under authority to support humanitarian efforts in Iraq, as well as to protect U.S. personnel and facilities.”

U.S. officials had earlier confirmed to ABC News that strikes had taken place near the Mosul Dam to support a joint Kurdish and Iraqi ground operation to retake the dam. One official labeled the strikes as significant.

Further airstrikes are possible as the U.S. will maintain aircraft in the sky to support the ongoing effort to seize the dam.

The size of the Iraqi and Kurdish ground operation is unclear, but it would have to be sizable to counter the large number of ISIS fighters located at or near the dam. One U.S. official said it is believed that there are a few hundred ISIS fighters in the vicinity of the dam.

U.S. officials confirm that fighter planes and drones launched airstrikes near the Mosul Dam. Earlier Saturday, Kurdish local media cited eyewitness reports that airstrikes had taken place by the dam on Friday night.

At the time it was unclear whether the airstrikes had been launched by U.S. or Iraqi aircraft.

According to one official “the strikes are in support of ground operations” by Kurdish and Iraqi forces to retake the dam. The official labeled the strikes as significant.

The size of the Iraqi and Kurdish ground operation is unclear, but it would have to be sizable to counter the large number of ISIS fighters located at or near the dam. One U.S. official said it is believed that there are a few hundred ISIS fighters in the vicinity of the dam.

The official said the strikes are allowed by the presidential authorization “to protect US personnel and support humanitarian efforts” that was issued last week. The airstrikes helped slow an ISIS advance on the Kurdish capital of Erbil and helped alleviate the humanitarian crisis of Yazidis trapped atop Mount Sinjar in northwestern Iraq.

On Thursday the Pentagon said that airstrikes could still take place and were authorized for anywhere in Iraq. The Mosul Dam is located 90 miles west of Erbil and 60 miles east of Mt. Sinjar.

“The airstrikes that we have been conducting and authorized to do so are predominantly to protect U.S. personnel and facilities in and around Erbil, although the president was very clear that we have the authority to conduct airstrikes to protect U.S. personnel and facilities anywhere in Iraq, including down in Baghdad,” Pentagon spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby said at a news conference.

Kirby also reiterated that President Obama had said the U.S. would help the Iraqi government, but “we’re not going to become the Iraqi air force. This is their fight to fight. We’re willing to help to the degree we can.”

While the U.S. has both military and civilian personnel in Erbil, there is not a U.S. presence in Mosul, which is south of the dam. There has been concern that a dam breach could lead to a torrent of water reaching as far south as Baghdad, where the large U.S. embassy is located on the banks of the Tigris River.

It is unclear what kind of aircraft launched today’s strikes, but the U.S. has been using a mix of F-15Es, F-16s, F/A-18s and Predator drones to conduct air strikes over northern Iraq, specifically the Erbil and Mt. Sinjar areas. The Navy F/A-18s have been flying from the carrier USS George HW Bush, which is located in the Persian Gulf.

Predators conducted airstrikes Friday on ISIS vehicles near the village of Kawju, which had been attacked by ISIS fighters. A defense official said that is the same village where reports emerged Friday that ISIS fighters had killed 80 Yazidi civilians.

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