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Election 2012: Live Updates Blog





Election Day is upon us! Did you vote today? Want to find out how your preferred candidate fared? Follow along with ABC/Univision for live updates on the results of the presidential race, key congressional races, and how and why people chose their leaders.

Click here to see ABC News/Yahoo live stream of election night and follow along with our live chat

Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012. 10:20 A.M. California House District 30


In California, with 100 percent of precincts reporting, ABC News projects that in the House District 30 race, Democrat Brad Sherman will win over Democrat Howard Berman.

2:32 A.M. Utah House District 04


Democrat Jim Matheson won reelection to a House seat in Utah's 4th congressional district, defeating Republican Mia Love.

Love, who would have been the first black woman to serve as a Republican in Congress, conceded to Matheson early Wednesday morning. "Congratulations to Jim on a hard fought victory," said Love. "It was a close race, but ultimately the voters of Utah have spoken." Love is the daughter Haitian immigrants who moved to the United States in the 1970s.

2:21 A.M. Nevada House District 03


In Nevada, based on the exit poll and our analysis of the vote in so far, ABC News projects that in the House District 03 race, Republican Joe Heck will win over Democrat John Oceguera.

2:12 A.M. Wisconsin Senate Race


In Wisconsin, based on the exit poll and our analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects that in the Senate race, Tammy Baldwin will win over Republican Tommy Thompson. Baldwin is the first openly gay person to serve in the Senate.

1:17 A.M. Nevada House District 04


In Nevada, based on the exit poll and our analysis of the vote in so far, ABC News projects that in the House District 04 race, Democrat Steve Horsford will win over Republican Danny Tarkanian.

1:08 A.M. Texas House District 23


In Texas, based on the exit poll and our analysis of the vote in so far, ABC News projects that in the Texas House District 23 race, Democrat Pete Gallego will win over Republican Francisco "Quico" Canseco.

Iowa Congressman Steve King Projected To Win Reelection

By Ted Hesson

In Iowa, ABC News projects that incumbent Republican Congressman Steve King will beat Democratic challenger Christie Vilsack in the race for Iowa's 5th congressional district.

The fiscally and socially conservative King is a favorite with Tea Party voters but in Vilsack he faced a well-funded and well-known opponent. Some voters knew Vilsack before she launched her campaign -- she's married to Tom Vilsack, former Iowa governor and current United States secretary of agriculture.

The victory is an affirmation for King, whose rhetoric has landed him in national headlines on several occasions. In May, he compared choosing immigration visa recipients to selecting a "good bird dog," a hunting metaphor that offended immigrant rights groups.

King is currently the vice chairman of the House immigration subcommittee, a body that considers issues like immigration policy and border security. The chair of that committee, Elton Gallegly, a Republican of California, is retiring this year.

King was passed over for the chairmanship in favor of Gallegy two years ago, but as the highest ranking member, his name will be in consideration again if his party holds the House of Representatives.

12:18 A.M.Colorado


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects Barack Obama will win Colorado.

12:02 AM House of Representatives


ABC News projects that Republicans will retain control of the House, but Democrats will gain between 1 and 5 seats.

Gender Gap Opens in Latino Obama Vote


By Richard Morin, The Note

President Obama's big win among Hispanic voters was fueled in part by Latino women who voted for Obama in greater numbers than they did four years ago, according to national exit polling.

Overall Obama won three out of every four votes (75%) cast by Hispanic women and 63% of Hispanic men, a 12-point gender gap. Four years ago the gap was only four points as Obama won 64% of men and 68% of Latino women. Romney won 35% of Latino men and 24% of women.

11:30 P.M. Barack Obama Projected to Win a Second Term



By Jordan Fabian, ABC/Univision

Barack Obama was reelected as president of the United States on Tuesday, on a pledge finish the work he started during his first term.

By Obama was able to win a battle for his political life against his Republican rival Mitt Romney. ABC News projected Obama would win a second term in the White House at 11:25 PM Tuesday night after he was projected to win the battleground state of Ohio.

READ MORE

11:27 P.M Senate


ABC News projects that Democrats will retain control of the Senate.

11:27 P.M. Obama Claims Big Win Among Latinos Nationwide

By Richard Morin, The Note

President Obama claimed two out of every three Latino votes nationwide, matching his performance among Hispanics four years ago, according to exit polls.

With votes still being cast in the far West, Obama was winning 69% of the Latino vote to Republican challenger Mitt Romney's 29%.

Four years ago the president won 67% of the Hispanic vote while his Republican opponent Sen. John McCain won 31% of the votes cast by Latinos.

So far Latinos have made up about 10% of the overall vote, roughly matching their 9% share in 2008.

11:25 P.M. Ohio


ABC News projects that President Barack Obama will be the next President of the United States, based on the state we are now projecting: Ohio.

11:20 P.M. Younger Voters Swell Obama Majority among Hispanics in Nevada

By Richard Morin, The Note

Latinos in Nevada continued President Obama's strong showing among Hispanics in the Mountain States. Obama claimed a decisive 69% to 24% of Hipsanic support over Republican challenger Mitt Romney, according to exit polling.

Obama won among virtually every major demographic group in the state. He did particularly well among younger voters in Nevada, claiming 76% of the vote among those younger than 45. In Contrast, Obama won a 56% of the vote among Hispanics 45 and older.

11:20 P.M. Iowa


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects Barack Obama will win Iowa.

11:13 P.M. North Carolina


Based on exit polling and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects that Mitt Romney will win in North Carolina.

11:12 P.M. Missouri


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects that Mitt Romney will win Missouri.

11 P.M. Exit Poll: White Voters Make Up Lowest Ever Share of Electorate

By OTUS News

Whites are down to 72 percent of the electorate in the latest national exit poll data – a new low in exit polls dating to 1976.

Romney holds an 18-point lead among whites (58-40 percent), the biggest lead for a Republican since 1988. But, as noted, there are fewer of them – and Obama wins a huge share of nonwhites.

Hawaii, Washington, California, Idaho, Arizona


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects that Barack Obama will win Hawaii, Washington and California. Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects Mitt Romney will win in Idaho and Arizona.

10:27 P.M. Wisconsin


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, Barack Obama will win in Wisconsin.

10:24 P.M. New Mexico


Based on exit polling and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects Barack Obama will win in New Mexico.

10:22 P.M. Obama Sweeping Latino Vote in Mountain States


By Richard Morin, The Note

The polls are closed in the Mountain West and the verdict of Hispanic voters here is clear. While the overall race results are not yet decided, by lopsided margins exit polling shows that President Obama handily won the Latino vote in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico. Here's a snapshot of the leanings of the Hispanic voters in these states:

Colorado: Among Hispanics, Obama is leading Republican challenger Mitt Romney 74% to 25%.

Arizona: Again, most likely a big win for the president among Hispanics. Obama claimed three-quarters (77%) of the Latino vote here to Romney's 22%.

New Mexico: Not quite as big a win here for Obama among Latinos, but still decisive. Obama claimed about two-thirds (66%) of the Hispanic vote to Romney's 28%.

10 P.M. Texas House District 20


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects that Democrat Joaquin Castro will win a House seat in Texas' 20th congressional district.

Castro, 38, is the twin brother of San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, who delivered the keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention in September. Joaquin Castro led Republican David Rosa 61-36 percent with 15 percent of precincts reporting at 9:45 P.M. ET.

Castro will replace long-time Rep. Charlie Gonzalez, the chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, who is retiring.

10 P.M. Montana, Utah, Minnesota, New Hampshire


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects Mitt Romney will win in Montana and Utah. Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects Barack Obama will win in Minnesota and New Hampshire. New Hampshire was considered a swing state.

9:57 P.M. Latinos Endorse Legal Abortion

By Richard Morin, The Note

Big majorities of Latinos across the country and other voters agreed that abortion should be legal, including nearly equal shares of men and women, according to exit polling.

Exit poll results found that about two-thirds of Hispanics (66%) said that abortion should be legal while 28% disagreed. Among all voters, a somewhat smaller majority (59%) would allow legal abortions while 37% were opposed.

There is no gender gap on views on abortion among Hispanics or among all voters, according to national exit polling. About two-thirds of men (64%) and Latino women (67%) would permit legal abortion, as would 58% of all male voters nationally and 60% of women.

9:53 P.M. Texas House District 16


In Texas, based on the exit poll and our analysis of the vote in so far, ABC News projects that in the Texas House District 16 race, Democrat Beto O'Rourke will win over Republican Barbara Carrasco. O'Rourke has been critical of the "war on drugs." He previously served as a representative of the El Paso, Texas area.

9:31 P.M. Exit Poll: Obama on Track for Best Performance Among Florida Latinos for a Democrat Since 1992

By Gary Langer

Obama's 60-39 percent among Hispanics in FL is better for him than in 2008 - 57-42 – and in fact the best for any Democrat among Hispanics in FL in exit polls back to 1992. Indeed from '92-'04 they broke for Republicans ('92, '04) or evenly ('96, '00).

9:23 P.M. Pennsylvania


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects Barack Obama will win in Pennsylvania.

9:12 P.M. House of Representatives


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote, ABC News projects Republicans will retain control of the House of Representatives.

9:07 P.M. Long Lines in Florida

By Emily DeRuy, ABC/Univision

Election Protection, a coalition of voter rights organizations, said its voter help hotline had registered more than 71,000 calls by 5:30 p.m. Eastern time. Most of the calls came from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, California, New York, Texas, Arizona and Florida, according to the group's afternoon conference call.

In Florida, a swing state that could play a pivotal role in deciding the next president of the United States, voters faced long waits as they attempted to cast ballots.

Adam Deitsch and Chris Frank, voters in Tamarac, Broward County, Florida, said they waited for nearly four hours to vote. Deitsch said a change in polling locations seemed to throw off some voters.

Voters in his district got a card in early July telling him he could vote at Fair Haven Club House. He received a second card in mid-September telling him it had been switched to Millennium Middle School.

Deitsch said the middle school only had four privacy booths and a couple of tables where voters were crammed together to cast ballots.

"It was the most not private thing ever," he said, adding that he waited an additional 20 minutes to feed his ballot into what he said was the only ballot-accepting machine at the poll.

"It felt like we were encouraged to self-disenfranchise," Deitsch said. He added that he's voted in four presidential elections, including the now-infamous 2000 race between Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Al Gore, and never faced such long lines.

"The person behind me hadn't seen the new card and went to the other location," Deitsch said, "and said there were 15 booths and no line, and we had to sit here for almost four hours."

Dietsche's mother tried to vote at the middle school in the morning, but had to go to work before she could cast her ballot. She returned at lunch to a long line and again after work around 4:30 to finally cast her ballot after a two hour wait.

Other voters simply walked away, discouraged, Dietsche said.

Frank said his father voted at a location down the street with far more privacy booths and poll workers.

"I've never seen anything like it," Deitsch said. "People were camping out."

A spokesperson for the Broward County supervisor of elections did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

9:01 P.M. Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Wyoming


Based on exit polling and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects that Mitt Romney will win in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming.

Romney is also projected to win four out of five electoral votes in Nebraska, which is one of two states that selects its electoral voters by popular vote within each congressional district. ABC News also projects Republican Ted Cruz will win the Texas Senate race over Democrat Paul Sadler. Cruz will become the third Hispanic member of the U.S. Senate, joining Democrat Bob Menendez and Republican Marco Rubio.

ABC News projects that Barack Obama will win in New York.

9:00 P.M. Michigan


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects that Barack Obama will win in Michigan.

8:55 P.M. Two-Thirds of Latinos and Half of all Voters See Romney Policies Favoring the Rich

By Richard Morin, The Note

By better than 2-1, Latino voters nationally say Republican nominee Mitt Romney's policies would benefit the rich over the middle class, while half say the policies of President Obama have mostly favored middle class Americans, according to preliminary exit poll results.

Two-thirds of Latinos (68%) who voted Tuesday say Romney's policies favor the rich, more than double the share (26%) who say they help the middle class. Less than 1% said Romney favors the poor. Among all voters, the views of Romney were only less one-sided. Still, about half (53%) said Romney's plans for the country would help the rich more than the middle class (34%) or poor (2%).

About half (51%) of all Latinos nationally say that Obama's polices have mostly helped the middle class more than the rich (5%) or the poor (28%), according to preliminary exit poll results. Among all voters, four-in-ten (44%) say the president has helped the middle class more than the rich (10%) or poor (31%).

8:53 P.M. Missisippi

Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects that Mitt Romney will win in Mississippi.

8:48 P.M. How are Florida Hispanic voters affecting the race?

By Gary Langer

Obama seems to be holding his 2008 strength among Hispanics – a key Florida voting group. Exit polls suggest that about one in six Florida voters are Latino (17 percent), perhaps a slight increase from 2008 (14 percent) to a high in exit poll data back to 1988, and they are voting for Obama over Romney by comparable margins to 2008 (60-39 percent). Non-Cuban Latinos in Florida are going for Obama by better than two to one, even as Romney has a narrow lead among Cuban-Americans.

At 8:19 PM, Romney led Obama by a slim 50-49 percent margin with 31 percent of precincts reporting. But results are still incomplete in key areas of the state, so stay tuned.

8:31 P.M. New Jersey, Tennesse


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects that Barack Obama will win in New Jersey and Mitt Romney will win in Tennessee.

ABC News also projects that Democrat Bob Menendez will win the New Jersey Senate race over Republican Joe Kyrillos.

8:30 P.M. Georgia, Alabama


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects Mitt Romney will win Georgia and Alabama.

8:29 P.M. Connecticut


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects Barack Obama will win in Connecticut.

8:24 P.M. Florida: Bill Nelson Projected to Win Over Connie Mack

By Jordan Fabian, ABC/Univision

Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects that Democrat Bill Nelson will win over Republican Connie Mack in the Florida Senate race.

Political observers had once predicted the incumbent Nelson would have a tough time winning reelection in the key presidential battleground state, but he has consistently led his Republican challenger in the final stretch of the campaign.

While Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney is running close in Florida, Mack was unable to pick up on his coattails, eliminating the possibility of Republicans picking up a seat in Florida in their quest take back a majority in the Senate.

ABC News does not yet have enough information to project a winner in the presidential race.

8:02 P.M. Illinois, D.C., Maryland, Massachusetts, Delaware, Rhode Island


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects Barack Obama will win in Illinois, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Delaware, and Rhode Island. Mitt Romney is projected to win in Oklahoma.

In Maine, ABC News projects three out of the state's four electoral votes for President Obama. Maine is one of two states that selects its electoral voters by popular vote within each congressional district.

8:01 P.M. Majority of Latinos Support State Recognition of Gay Marriage

By Richard Morin, The Note

Hispanic voters were more likely than other voters to say they would approve if their state recognized same-sex marriage, according to preliminary exit poll results.

Nearly six-in-ten Latino voters (59%) said their state should legally recognize same-sex marriage while 32% said their state should not. But among all voters, about half (48%) favored legalization of gay marriage while nearly the same share said they would oppose it (47%).

Non-Hispanic whites were the most opposed to states legally sanctioning same-sex marriage (47% favored but 50% were opposed). Among blacks, half (52%) would support while 40% opposed state support for gay unions.

7:40 P.M. South Carolina


Based on exit polls and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects Mitt Romney will win in South Carolina.

7:31 P.M. Florida Latinos More Divided on Obama

By Richard Morin, The Note

A first look at preliminary Florida exit poll results finds Florida Hispanics with more divided feelings about the Obama administration than Latinos nationally and a somewhat more favorable view of Republican nominee Mitt Romney.

At the same time, Hispanics in Florida are more positive about President Obama and find Romney less appealing than other voters in the Sunshine state.

Overall about four-in-ten Florida Latinos say they are "angry" (14%) or "dissatisfied" (26%) with the president's administration while 26% say are "satisfied" and 23% are "enthusiastic."

Among Latinos nationally, only about three-in-ten express anger (7%) or dissatisfaction (21%) with the Obama presidency and seven-in-ten are satisfied (34%) or enthusiastic (37%). (All voters nationally offered a mixed verdict of Obama's administration: 21% were angry, 29% were dissatisfied, 23% were satisfied and 25% were enthusiastic.)

These differences are mostly explained by the continuing influence of Florida's large Cuban-American population who are more politically conservative and Republican than other Hispanics. The migration of Puerto Ricans and immigrants from elsewhere in Latin America into the state—groups that have tended to vote more Democratic—have meant that Cuban-Americans comprise a shrinking share of the Hispanic vote.

While the sample of Cuban-Americans is too small to analyze, the verdict of non-Cuban Latinos suggests the gulf in attitudes between the two groups. Among these Hispanics, more than six-in-ten were either enthusiastic or satisfied with the Obama administration—or nearly as positive as Hispanics nationally about the administration.

Overall, 55% of Florida Latinos had a "favorable" view of Obama while 41% said they had a negative opinion of the president. Hispanic voters in general were somewhat cooler toward Romney (47% favorable, 47% unfavorable).

Among all Florida voters, 52% had a favorable view of Obama and 46% had a negative opinion; about as many (50%) had a favorable view of Romney and 46% had a negative opinion of him.

These preliminary exit poll results are based on a total sample size of 475 Latinos and a total sample size of 3,128. Margin of sampling error for the sample of Latinos is approximately plus or minus 7 percentage points and plus or minus 3 points for the full sample.

7:30 P.M. West Virginia


Based on the exit poll and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects Mitt Romney will win West Virginia.

6:29 P.M. Latinos See Obama as Best to Handle Economy, Deficit and Foreign Crisis

By Richard Morin, The Note

In a presidential campaign dominated by pocketbook issues, a majority of Hispanic voters nationally say President Barack Obama is better able to deal with the country's economic woes than his Republican challenger Mitt Romney, according to preliminary exit poll results. Six-in-ten of all Latino voters (61%) named the economy as the top problem facing the country, outdistancing health care (18%), the deficit (12%), and foreign policy (6%) as voting issues. Among all voters, about an equal share named the economy (60%) while 17% named health care, 15% said the deficit, and 4% said foreign policy. Check the ABC News Live Blog for updates throughout the day and results all night.

Latinos and other voters had somewhat different views on the hot-button issue of immigration policy. Three-quarters of Latinos (74%) said employed illegal immigrants should be offered a chance to apply for legal status while 22% said they should be deported to their home country. A smaller but still substantial majority of all voters (64%) favored a path to legal status for employed illegal immigrants while 29% said they should be deported.

While all voters shared similar concerns, Hispanics differed from other voters in their perceptions of which candidate was best able to deal with the nation's economic problems. When asked which candidate would better handle the economy, more than six-in-ten (64%) named Obama while 35% said Romney. Among all voters, 50% favored Romney while 47% for Obama as the candidate best able to deal with the economy.

Hispanics also preferred Obama over Romney to handle the federal budget deficit (67% vs. 32%) and Medicare (65% vs. 32%). All voters split nearly down the middle: 50% preferred Romney to deal with the deficit while 46% favored Obama. On Medicare, about half (51%) said Obama would do the better job while 45% preferred Romney.

Latinos nationally also expressed more confidence in Obama than Romney to handle an international crisis. About seven-in-ten (69%) said they trusted Obama and 31% said they do not. When voters were asked the same question about Romney, 37% said they trusted him but 57% said they did not. Among all voters, 56% said they trusted Obama (43% did not) while 51% had similar confidence in Romney but 44% did not.

Latino voters were concerned with more than just policy issues on Election Day. Asked which quality mattered most in deciding their vote, a third (33%) said they were looking for a candidate with "a vision for the future" and 26% said they were looking for a candidate who "cares about people like me." Smaller proportions said they most valued a candidate who "shares my values" (20%) while 17% wanted "a strong leader." Among all voters, 29% wanted a candidate with vision, 28% sought someone with similar values, 20% wanted someone who cared, and 19% said they were looking for a strong leader.

Overall, President Obama's approval rating among Hispanics stood at 66% in preliminary results while 32% disapproved. Among all voters, 52% approved of the job Obama was doing as president and 46% disapproved. Margin of sampling error is larger when results are based on only a portion of the sample.

These preliminary exit poll results are based on a total sample size of 1,336 Latinos and a total sample size of 15,863. Margin of sampling error for the sample of Latinos is approximately plus or minus 5 percentage points and plus or minus 2 points for the full sample.

7:00 P.M. Indiana, Kentucky, Vermont

By Jordan Fabian, ABC/Univision

Based on the exit poll and analysis of the vote so far, ABC News projects Mitt Romney will win Indiana and Kentucky (Barack Obama won Indiana in 2008) and Obama will win Vermont.

6:29 P.M. Latinos See Obama as Best to Handle Economy, Deficit and Foreign Crisis

By Richard Morin, The Note

In a presidential campaign dominated by pocketbook issues, a majority of Hispanic voters nationally say President Barack Obama is better able to deal with the country's economic woes than his Republican challenger Mitt Romney, according to preliminary exit poll results.

Six-in-ten of all Latino voters (61%) named the economy as the top problem facing the country, outdistancing health care (18%) the deficit (12%) and foreign policy (6%) as voting issues. Among all voters, about an equal share named the economy (60%) while 17% named health care, 15% said the deficit and 4% said foreign policy.

Latinos and other voters had somewhat different views on the hot-button issue of immigration policy. Three-quarters Latinos (74%) said employed illegal immigrants should be offered a chance to apply for legal status while 22% said they should be deported to their home country. A smaller but still substantial majority of all voters (64%) favored a path to legal status for employed illegal immigrants while 29% said they should be deported.

While voters shared similar concerns, Hispanics differed from other voters in their perceptions of which candidate was best able to deal with the nation's economic problems. When asked which candidate would better handle the economy, more than six-in-ten (64%) named Obama while 35% said Romney. Among all voters: 50% favored Romney while 47% for Obama as the candidate best able to deal with the economy.

Hispanics also preferred Obama over Romney to handle the federal budget deficit (67% vs. 32%) and Medicare (65% vs. 32%). All voters split nearly down the middle: 50% preferred Romney to deal with the deficit while 46% favored Obama. On Medicare, about half (51%) said Obama would do the better job while 45% preferred Romney.

Latinos nationally also expressed more confidence in Obama than Romney to handle an international crisis. About seven-in-ten (69%) said they trusted Obama and 31% said they do not. When voters were asked the same question about Romney, 37% said they trusted him but 57% said they did not. Among all voters, 56% said they trusted Obama (43% did not) while 51% had similar confidence in Romney but 44% did not.

Latino voters were concerned than more than just policy issues on election day. Asked which candidate quality mattered most in deciding their vote, a third (33%) said they were looking for a candidate with "a vision for the future" and 26% said they were looking for a candidate who "cares about people like me." Smaller proportions said they most valued a candidate who "shares my values" (20%) while 17% wanted "a strong leader." Among all voters, 29% wanted a candidate with vision, 28% sought someone with similar values, 20% wanted someone who cared and 19% said they were looking for a strong leader.

Overall, President Obama's approval rating among Hispanics stood at 66% in preliminary results while 32% disapproved. Among all voters, 52% approved of the job Obama was doing as president and 46% disapproved. Margin of sampling error is larger when results are based on only a portion of the sample.

These preliminary exit poll results are based on a total sample size of 1,336 Latinos and a total sample size of 15,863. Margin of sampling error for the sample of Latinos is approximately plus or minus 5 percentage points and plus or minus 2 points for the full sample.

5:00 P.M. Senate and House Races to Watch

By OTUS News

Out of Reach? 25 House Races to Watch on Election Night

There are 435 seats in the House of Representatives, and here is a look at 25 of the top match-ups worth watching on Election Day. READ MORE

Senate Snapshots: 17 Senate Races to Watch

Race-by-race analysis of each Senate race.READ MORE

4:18 P.M. Election 2012: Inside the Latino Vote

By Richard Morin, The Note

Latino voters are poised to play a pivotal role in today's state and national elections. Today nearly 24 million Hispanics are eligible to vote, an increase of more than 4 million since 2008.

Throughout Election Night I will be analyzing state and national exit polls, looking for the issues that mattered the most to Hispanics, how they assess the two candidates and what new voting patterns are emerging in the Hispanic electorate. And I will be sharing what I find in regular posts on the Politics blog.

The first preliminary exit poll results will mark the unofficial start of Election Night 2012. So plan to check the Politics blog early and often for the latest on the Latino vote.

11 A.M. Keep an Eye on These 4 Things During the Election

By Jordan Fabian, ABC/Univision


After nearly two years of campaigning, Election Day is finally upon us.

Both President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney have been thoroughly vetted and voters in 13 competitive states have heard their messages over and over again through $825 million in television ads and even more on-the-ground campaigning. Judging from the polls, a vast majority of voters have made up their minds with only a sliver remaining undecided.

Here are four things you should watch for as the nation picks its next president. READ MORE