Top 10 presidential candidate quotes from night 2 of the Democratic debate

PHOTO: 2020 democratic presidential candidates participate in the second night of the first 2020 democratic presidential debate at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 27, 2019.PlayMike Segar/Reuters
WATCH Democratic Debate 2019: Key moments that mattered from the second night

Night two of the two-hour Democratic primary debate was filled with some testy and viral moments from the candidates. Here's a look some of the top quotes of the night.

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“We got to talk about one other thing, cause the Republican party likes to cloak itself in the language of religion. Now, our party doesn't talk about that as much largely for a very good reason which was, we are committed to the separation of church and state and we stand for people of any religion and people of no religion, but we should call hypocrisy when we see it. And for a party that associates with Christianity to say it is okay to suggest that God would smile on the division of families at the hands of federal agents that god would condone putting children in cages has lost all claim to ever use religious language again.”

South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, to roaring applause, attacked the Republican party for what he called religious “hypocrisy” and called on the Democratic party to reclaim religion.

“America does not want to witness a food fight, they want to know how we’re gonna put food on their table.”

California Sen. Kamala Harris commented on the back-and-forth bickering between candidates, which received praise from Katy Perry and others on Twitter.

"President Obama, I think, did a heck of a job, to compare him to what this guy's doing is absolutely, I find close to immoral."

Twice on Thursday night, former Vice President Joe Biden was asked to defend President Obama's legacy, and in this instance he was asked on the Obama-Biden administration deportation of more than 3 million Americans.

“I was 6 years-old when a presidential candidate came to the California Democratic convention and said it's time to pass the torch to a new generation of Americans. That candidate was then senator Joe Biden. Joe Biden was right when he said it was time to pass the torch to a new generation of Americans 32 years ago. He is still right today. If we are going to solve the issues of automation, pass the torch. If we are going to solve the issues of climate chaos, pass the torch.”

California Rep. Eric Swalwell came out swinging with the first blow to Biden saying it is time for him to “pass the torch” to new leadership.

“But Vice President Biden, do you agree today that you were wrong to oppose busing in America then? Do you agree?”

PHOTO: Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris participate in the second night of the first 2020 democratic presidential debate at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 27, 2019. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris participate in the second night of the first 2020 democratic presidential debate at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 27, 2019.

Harris and Biden had a heated exchange in which the senator pushed the former vice president on matters of race and cited his lauding his own work with segregationists senators who held views he disagreed with and busing students during intergration. She forced Biden to explain his stance on busing minority students to predominently white schools and districts by trying to point out the nuance of his position—that he didn’t support the court ordered busing by the Department of Education.

“Imagine, we are in Florida, imagine the Parkland kids having as much power in our democracy as the Koch brothers or the NRA. Imagine their voices carrying farther and wider than anyone else because their voice is needed.”

PHOTO: Kristen Gillibrand participates in the second night of the first 2020 democratic presidential debate at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 27, 2019. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Kristen Gillibrand participates in the second night of the first 2020 democratic presidential debate at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 27, 2019.

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand had a big moment when she spoke on the need for immediate gun reform and her plans to accomplish this if elected president.

“Unlike the Republican party, we encourage diversity, we believe in diversity. That's what America is about.”

The Republican party was shown no love during night two of the Democratic debate. This time, it was Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders attacking the perceived lack of diversity within the Republican party.

PHOTO: Bernie Sanders participates in the second night of the first 2020 democratic presidential debate at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 27, 2019. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Bernie Sanders participates in the second night of the first 2020 democratic presidential debate at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, June 27, 2019.

“You asked before, what is the greatest national security threat to the United States, it's Donald Trump.”

Harris came out swinging at President Donald Trump’s stance on climate change, foreign policy, and immigration.

"When I see these kids at the border, I see my mom, because I know she sees herself because she was separated from her parents for years during the Holocaust in Poland.”

Colorado Sen. Michael Bennett attacked the current state of family separation at the border by sharing with voters a story of his mother being seperated from her own family during the Holocaust.

"We must be a country who loves our children more than we love our guns.”

Swalwell, sporting an orange tie for gun violence awareness, spoke to voters on how he would tackle gun reform as president.